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dc.contributor.authorPowell, Michael D.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-23T08:00:27Zen
dc.date.available2019-04-23T08:00:27Zen
dc.date.issued2019-04-22en
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:19339en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/89085en
dc.description.abstractDuring the course of an immune response, CD4+ T helper cells differentiate into a number of subsets including: T helper 1 (TH1), TH2, TH17, and T follicular helper (TFH) populations. The functional diversity of CD4+ T effector cells results in a coordinated, pathogen-specific immune response. For example, the production of IFNγ by TH1 cells is vital for the clearance of intracellular pathogens, while TFH cell engagement with cognate B cells is required for germinal center (GC) formation and the generation of pathogen- and vaccine- induced antibody production. The development of CD4+ subsets is contingent on extracellular signals, in the form of cytokines, and downstream transcriptional networks responsible for promoting the unique gene expression profile for each subset while simultaneously suppressing alternative cell fates. However, the exact composition of, and stage-specific requirements for, these environmental cytokines and transcription factor networks in the governance of TFH cell differentiation remain incompletely understood. The work in this dissertation seeks to understand how cell-extrinsic cytokine signals and cell-intrinsic transcription factor activities are integrated to properly regulate TFH cell development. Here, we demonstrate that in response to decreased IL-2 and constant IL-12 signaling, T helper 1 (TH1) cells upregulate a TFH-like phenotype, including expression of the TFH lineage defining transcription factor Bcl-6. Intriguingly, our work established that signals from IL-12 were required for both the differentiation and function of this TFH-like population. Mechanistically, IL-12 signals are propagated through both STAT3 and STAT4, leading to the upregulation of the TFH associated genes Bcl6, Il21, and Icos, correlating with increased B cell helper activity. Conversely, exposure of these TFH-like cells to IL-7 results in the STAT5-dependent repression of Bcl-6 and subsequent inhibition of the TFH phenotype. Finally, we describe a novel regulatory mechanism wherein STAT3 and the Ikaros zinc finger transcription factors Ikaros and Aiolos cooperate to regulate Bcl-6 expression in these TFH-like cells. Collectively, the work in this dissertation significantly advances our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that govern TFH cell differentiation, setting the basis for the rational design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies and increasingly effective vaccines.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectCD4+ T follicular helper cellen
dc.subjectBCL-6en
dc.subjectcytokinesen
dc.subjectinterleuckin-2en
dc.subjectinterleukin-7en
dc.subjectinterleukin-12en
dc.subjectSTAT transcription factorsen
dc.subjectIkZF transcription factorsen
dc.titleInsights Into the Regulatory Requirements for T Follicular Helper Cell Developmenten
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.description.degreePh. D.en
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineTranslational Biology, Medicine and Healthen
dc.contributor.committeechairOestreich, Kennethen
dc.contributor.committeememberLi, Liwuen
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, Irving C.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMcDonald, Sarahen
dc.description.abstractgeneralSpecialized cells called T helper cells serve as a critical interface between the innate (first line of defense) and adaptive (specialized and long-term) immune systems. During the course of an infection, T helper cells are responsible for orchestrating the immune-mediated elimination of invading viruses, bacteria, and parasites. This wide breadth of functionality is achieved through the formation of distinct T helper subsets including T helper 1 (TH1), TH2, TH17, and T follicular helper (TFH) populations. Individual subsets have distinct developmental requirements and have unique functions within the immune system. For example, TFH cells are required for the production of effective antibodies that recognize invading pathogens, leading to their subsequent elimination. This naturally occurring process is the basis for a number of modern medical therapies including vaccination. Conversely, aberrant generation of antibodies that recognize host tissues can result in the onset of various autoimmune diseases including lupus, multiple sclerosis, and crohn’s disease. Due to the importance of TFH cells to human health, there is intense interest in understanding how these cells are formed. It is recognized that the generation of these therapeutically important immune cells is mediated by numerous cell-extrinsic andintrinsic influences, including proteins in their cellular environment called cytokines, and important proteins inside of the cell called transcription factors. However, as this is a complicated and multi-step process, many questions remain regarding the identity of these cytokines and transcription factors. The work in this dissertation seeks to understand how cellextrinsic cytokine signals and cell-intrinsic transcription factor activities are integrated to properly regulate TFH cell development. Collectively, this body of work significantly advances our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that govern TFH cell differentiation, setting the basis for the rational design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies and increasingly effective vaccines.en


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