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dc.contributor.authorDuster, Troy
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-25T20:08:25Z
dc.date.available2019-04-25T20:08:25Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/89149
dc.description.abstractWhen we consider the possibilities for a new progressive era in American higher education, it seems wise to review the past. Unfortunately, for the first two-thirds of its history, American higher education had a decidedly apartheid-like character. It was not until the late 1960s that the nation finally broke through the barriers that had effectively separated races, religions, and genders into separate colleges. This article examines some of the key social, economic and political forces that generated these changes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Education Association
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNational Education Association
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjecthigher education and state
dc.subjectAfrican American students
dc.subjectsegregation in higher education--United States
dc.titleThe Long Path to Higher Education for African Americansen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.accessed2019-02-12
dc.type.dcmitypeText
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://www.nea.org/assets/docs/HE/TA09PathHEDuster.pdf


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
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