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dc.contributor.authorEscobar, Stacy Raeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T08:00:16Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T08:00:16Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-28
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:19859en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/89629
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the languages attitudes surrounding the standard (Academic Guaraní) and vernacular (Jopará) varieties of Guaraní, as well as the reported language use for Spanish and the two varieties of Guaraní. The study addresses language attitudes as manifestations of pride, loyalty, and prestige and reported language usage characteristic of a dichotomy between high and low varieties (e.g. Loureiro-Rodríguez, 2008) in order to determine if similar language attitudes and linguistic norms are evident in this community. A survey was used to gather data from 10 students and 10 teachers who live and work in Altos de La Cordillera (a small town with rural and urban features). Contrary to the findings of previous research studies on the language attitudes associated with high and low varieties (e.g. Garrett, 2001), the participants of this study appear to show an all-round favorability for the standard variety of Guaraní (Academic Guaraní). Furthermore, the reported language use of Spanish, Jopará, and Academic Guaraní does not seem to provide evidence for a Spanish/Guaraní diglossia in this community nor does there appear to be a dichotomy between the high and low varieties of Guaraní such as what has historically existed between Spanish and Guaraní. The participants' language attitudes and patterns of reported language use are interpreted in relation to notions of solidarity, superiority, accommodation, and the relationship between adolescence and identity formation.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectstandard and vernacular varieties of Guaraníen_US
dc.subjectSpanishen_US
dc.subjectreported language useen_US
dc.subjectlanguage attitudesen_US
dc.titleLanguage Attitudes and Reported Usage of the Standard and Vernacular Varieties of Guaraní in Paraguayen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForeign Languagesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForeign Languages, Cultures, and Literaturesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairGudmestad, Aarnes E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFolkart, Jessica A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalker, Abby Jewelen_US
dc.description.abstractgeneralThis study examines the languages attitudes surrounding the variety of Guaraní taught in school (Academic Guaraní) and the primarily oral variety of Guaraní (Jopará) historically spoken at home or in private contexts. It also examines the reported language use for Spanish and the two varieties of Guaraní. The study addresses language attitudes as manifestations of pride, loyalty, and prestige and reported language usage characteristic of multilingual communities in order to determine if similar language attitudes and linguistic norms are evident in this community. A survey was used to gather data from 10 students and 10 teachers who live and work in Altos de La Cordillera (a small town with rural and urban characteristics). The participants of this study appear to show an all-round favorability for the standard variety of Guaraní (Academic Guaraní). Furthermore, the reported language use of Spanish, Jopará, and Academic Guaraní does not seem to be connected to the formality or informality of the given situation or context. The participants’ language attitudes and patterns of reported language use are interpreted in reference to inter and intra-group relations and the notion of superiority.en


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