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dc.contributor.authorFolgar, Carlosen
dc.contributor.editorPoquette, Benen
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-19T21:11:08Zen
dc.date.available2019-06-19T21:11:08Zen
dc.date.issued2006-09-22en
dc.identifier.citationFolgar, C., 2006. System X: An Advanced Tool for Material Science and Engineering. Journal of Undergraduate Materials Research, 2. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jumr.v2i0.0612en
dc.identifier.issn1934-7677en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/90312en
dc.description.abstractVirginia Tech students now have one of the world’s most powerful research tools in their own backyard.In the winter of 2003, Virginia Tech researchers took major strides in supercomputer innovation when their high-profile supercomputer was ranked the third-fastest computer.It was given the name “System X” because it was the first academic supercomputer to pass 10 teraflops, or 10 trillion floating point operations per second.In addition to processing data at high speeds, it is also the cheapest available supercomputer.en
dc.format.extent1 pageen
dc.format.extent249.43 KBen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/zipen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherVirginia Tech Department of Materials Science and Engineeringen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectMaterial Scienceen
dc.subjectSupercomputeren
dc.subjectSystem Xen
dc.titleSystem X: An Advanced Tool for Material Science and Engineeringen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holderVirginia Tech Department of Materials Science and Engineeringen
dc.title.serialJournal of Undergraduate Materials Researchen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.21061/jumr.v2i0.0612en
dc.identifier.volume2en
dc.identifier.issue1en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.identifier.eissn2578-9570en


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