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dc.contributor.authorHuelsman, Marken
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-02T17:07:13Z
dc.date.available2019-07-02T17:07:13Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/90865
dc.description.abstractIt is no surprise that students of color are socially excluded on campuses, or that the very existence of students of color invites awkward attention. Individual incidents on campus shine a light on this broad systemic exclusion of students of color. This exclusion is true even for elite public institutions, which still have a basic responsibility to be representative of and responsive to the needs of their state populations and economies. This report takes a look at whether selective public colleges have made progress toward these basic goals. The report shows that unfortunately, most states have very far to go in making their selective public institutions representative, and thus truly public. In many cases, institutions are less representative than they were a generation ago.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDemosen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDemosen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectstudents of coloren
dc.subjectminority studentsen
dc.subjectrace discrimination in higher educationen
dc.subjectrepresentative institutionsen
dc.titleSocial Exclusion: The State of State U for Black Studentsen
dc.typeReporten
dc.date.accessed2019-06-04
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttps://www.demos.org/sites/default/files/publications/SocialExclusion_StateOf.pdf


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International