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dc.contributor.authorHilker, Jesse Kirtlanden_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-10T08:02:26Z
dc.date.available2019-07-10T08:02:26Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-09
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:20675en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/91394
dc.description.abstractThis project aims to chronicle the process of building from the architects point of view. Not mindless, mechanical tasks aimed at some economic goal; but tangible, thoughtful work towards an educational and philosophical desire. The desire to be a Master-Builder has fueled architects for centuries. It is a role that the common definition of Architect has all but forgotten. While in practice very few of us will continue this tradition, it is important that we not lose this fundamental aspect of building. To begin to fulfill oneself with this title, the path is very simple: build a building. That is what follows in this book. It is a chronological outline of the design and build of the New River Valley Train Observation Tower. An additional layer to this project is the inclusion of a variety of innovative building materials/techniques, particularity the use of hardwood cross-laminated timber (CLT). This building will serve as an ongoing research opportunity to evaluate the conditions of building with this material in an extreme condition, complete exposure to weather. No work of architecture is a solo endeavor, yet my heavy involvement in the design, documentation, and building of the tower has culminated in a body of work that is distinctly my own. My role was that of a project manager, and I reported to faculty Kay Edge, Edward Becker, and Robert Riggs. This structure allowed me to have a great deal of independence, while vetting my drawings and ideas with experienced professionals. A small group of students joined me in the larger aspects of the build, which provided another opportunity to discover an aspect so critical to building: collaboration. This build taught so much about project management, design, and realization that could only be understood through such a physical experience.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectDesign/Builden_US
dc.subjectCross-Laminated Timberen_US
dc.subjectMaterial Researchen_US
dc.titleOn Building: A Return of the Master Builderen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentIndustrial Designen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairEdge, Kay F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBecker, Edward Gentryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDunay, Robert J.en_US
dc.description.abstractgeneralThis project aims to chronicle the process of building from the architects point of view. Not mindless, mechanical tasks aimed at some economic goal; but tangible, thoughtful work towards an educational and philosophical desire. The desire to be a Master-Builder has fueled architects for centuries. It is a role that the common definition of Architect has all but forgotten. While in practice very few of us will continue this tradition, it is important that we not lose this fundamental aspect of building. To begin to fulfill oneself with this title, the path is very simple: build a building. That is what follows in this book. It is a chronological outline of the design and build of the New River Valley Train Observation Tower. An additional layer to this project is the inclusion of a variety of innovative building materials/techniques, particularity the use of hardwood cross-laminated timber (CLT). This building will serve as an ongoing research opportunity to evaluate the conditions of building with this material in an extreme condition, complete exposure to weather. No work of architecture is a solo endeavor, yet my heavy involvement in the design, documentation, and building of the tower has culminated in a body of work that is distinctly my own. My role was that of a project manager, and I reported to faculty Kay Edge, Edward Becker, and Robert Riggs. This structure allowed me to have a great deal of independence, while vetting my drawings and ideas with experienced professionals. A small group of students joined me in the larger aspects of the build, which provided another opportunity to discover an aspect so critical to building: collaboration. This build taught so much about project management, design, and realization that could only be understood through such a physical experience.en


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