Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorShrivastava, Manishen
dc.contributor.authorAndreae, Meinrat O.en
dc.contributor.authorArtaxo, Pauloen
dc.contributor.authorBarbosa, Henrique M. J.en
dc.contributor.authorBerg, Larry K.en
dc.contributor.authorBrito, Joelen
dc.contributor.authorChing, Josephen
dc.contributor.authorEaster, Richard C.en
dc.contributor.authorFan, Jiwenen
dc.contributor.authorFast, Jerome D.en
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Zheen
dc.contributor.authorFuentes, Jose D.en
dc.contributor.authorGlasius, Marianneen
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Allen H.en
dc.contributor.authorAlves, Eliane Gomesen
dc.contributor.authorGomes, Helberen
dc.contributor.authorGu, Dasaen
dc.contributor.authorGuenther, Alexen
dc.contributor.authorJathar, Shantanu H.en
dc.contributor.authorKim, Saewungen
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yingen
dc.contributor.authorLou, Sijiaen
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Scot T.en
dc.contributor.authorMcNeill, V. Fayeen
dc.contributor.authorMedeiros, Adanen
dc.contributor.authorde Sa, Suzane S.en
dc.contributor.authorShilling, John E.en
dc.contributor.authorSpringston, Stephen R.en
dc.contributor.authorSouza, R. A. F.en
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Joel A.en
dc.contributor.authorIsaacman-VanWertz, Gabrielen
dc.contributor.authorYee, Lindsay D.en
dc.contributor.authorYnoue, Ritaen
dc.contributor.authorZaveri, Rahul A.en
dc.contributor.authorZelenyuk, Allaen
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Chunen
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-30T16:43:01Z
dc.date.available2019-07-30T16:43:01Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-05en
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723en
dc.identifier.other1046en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/92049
dc.description.abstractOne of the least understood aspects in atmospheric chemistry is how urban emissions influence the formation of natural organic aerosols, which affect Earth's energy budget. The Amazon rainforest, during its wet season, is one of the few remaining places on Earth where atmospheric chemistry transitions between preindustrial and urban-influenced conditions. Here, we integrate insights from several laboratory measurements and simulate the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the Amazon using a high-resolution chemical transport model. Simulations show that emissions of nitrogen-oxides from Manaus, a city of similar to 2 million people, greatly enhance production of biogenic SOA by 60-200% on average with peak enhancements of 400%, through the increased oxidation of gas-phase organic carbon emitted by the forests. Simulated enhancements agree with aircraft measurements, and are much larger than those reported over other locations. The implication is that increasing anthropogenic emissions in the future might substantially enhance biogenic SOA in pristine locations like the Amazon.en
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Biological, and Environmental Research's Atmospheric System Research (ASR) programen
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research through the Early Career Research Programen
dc.description.sponsorshipAtmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilityen
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. Department of Energy Office of Science user facility - Office of Biological and Environmental Researchen
dc.description.sponsorshipDOE [DE-AC06-76RL01830]en
dc.description.sponsorshipUS Department of Energy under the GoAmazon2014/5 project [13/50521-7]en
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. Department of Energy Office of Science [DE-SC0018221]en
dc.description.sponsorshipCentral Office of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)en
dc.description.sponsorshipInstituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA)en
dc.description.sponsorshipInstituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE)en
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidade do Estado do Amazonas (UEA)en
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidade do Estado do Amazonas (FAPEAM/GOAMAZON)en
dc.description.sponsorshipFAPESP [2013/05014-0, 2017/17047-0]en
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of Biological and Environmental Researchen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleUrban pollution greatly enhances formation of natural aerosols over the Amazon rainforesten
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.contributor.departmentCivil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.description.notesThis work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Biological, and Environmental Research's Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program. Dr. Shrivastava was also supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research through the Early Career Research Program. The authors thank the G-1 flight and ground crews for supporting the GoAmazon 2014/5 mission. Funding for data collection onboard the G-1 aircraft and at the ground sites was provided by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science user facility sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract DE-AC06-76RL01830. R.Y. support at PNNL was provided by the US Department of Energy under the GoAmazon2014/5 project (Proc. no. 13/50521-7). J.A.T. was supported through a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science DE-SC0018221. We acknowledge the support from the Central Office of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), and the Universidade do Estado do Amazonas (UEA and FAPEAM/GOAMAZON). P.A. was supported by FAPESP grants 2013/05014-0 and 2017/17047-0. The work was conducted under licenses 001030/2012-4 and 001262/2012-2 of the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq). Computational resources for the simulations were provided by the PNNL Institutional Computing (PIC) facility and EMSL (a DOE Office of Science User Facility sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at PNNL).en
dc.title.serialNature Communicationsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-08909-4en
dc.identifier.volume10en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.dcmitypeStillImageen
dc.identifier.pmid30837467en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International