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dc.contributor.authorHonda, Jennifer R.en
dc.contributor.authorHasan, Nabeeh A.en
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Rebecca M.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Myra D.en
dc.contributor.authorEpperson, L. Elaineen
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Paul R.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Terryen
dc.contributor.authorIakhiaeva, Elenaen
dc.contributor.authorBankowski, Matthew J.en
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Richard J., Jr.en
dc.contributor.authorChan, Edward D.en
dc.contributor.authorFalkinham, Joseph O., IIIen
dc.contributor.authorStrong, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-09T14:43:24Z
dc.date.available2019-08-09T14:43:24Z
dc.date.issued2016-10en
dc.identifier.issn1935-2735en
dc.identifier.othere0005068en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/93022
dc.description.abstractLung disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Epidemiologic studies have shown the Hawaiian Islands have the highest prevalence of NTM lung infections in the United States. However, potential environmental reservoirs and species diversity have not been characterized. In this cross-sectional study, we describe molecular and phylogenetic comparisons of NTM isolated from 172 household plumbing biofilms and soil samples from 62 non-patient households and 15 respiratory specimens. Although non-uniform geographic sampling and availability of patient information were limitations, Mycobacterium chimaera was found to be the dominant species in both environmental and respiratory specimens. In contrast to previous studies from the continental U.S., no Mycobacterium avium was identified. Mycobacterium intracellulare was found only in respiratory specimens and a soil sample. We conclude that Hawai'i's household water sources contain a unique composition of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), increasing our appreciation of NTM organisms of pulmonary importance in tropical environments.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH Biomedical Informatics training grant [2T15LM009451-06]; Amon G. Carter Foundationen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLOSen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectavium complexen
dc.subjectlung-diseaseen
dc.subjectepidemiologyen
dc.subjectinfectionen
dc.subjectwateren
dc.subjectintracellulareen
dc.subjectabscessusen
dc.subjectpathogensen
dc.subjectoutbreaken
dc.subjectnumbersen
dc.titleEnvironmental Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in the Hawaiian Islandsen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.contributor.departmentBiological Sciencesen_US
dc.description.notesJRH acknowledges the University of Colorado AMC Division of Pulmonary Medicine and the Shoot for the Cure Foundation. NAH acknowledges the NIH Biomedical Informatics training grant 2T15LM009451-06. MS acknowledges the Boettcher Webb-Waring Foundation and the Potts Memorial Foundation. Finally, the University of Texas Health Science Center and National Jewish Health would like to acknowledge support from the Amon G. Carter Foundation. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en
dc.title.serialPLOS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005068en
dc.identifier.volume10en
dc.identifier.issue10en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.dcmitypeStillImageen
dc.identifier.pmid27780201en


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
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