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dc.contributor.authorMoore, Michelleen
dc.contributor.authorSylla, Massambaen
dc.contributor.authorGoss, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorBurugu, Marion Warigiaen
dc.contributor.authorSang, Rosemaryen
dc.contributor.authorKamau, Luna W.en
dc.contributor.authorKenya, Eucharia Unomaen
dc.contributor.authorBosio, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorde Lourdes Munoz, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorSharakhova, Maria V.en
dc.contributor.authorBlack, William C.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-12T17:01:45Zen
dc.date.available2019-08-12T17:01:45Zen
dc.date.issued2013-04en
dc.identifier.issn1935-2735en
dc.identifier.othere2175en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/93032en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Aedes aegypti is the primary global vector to humans of yellow fever and dengue flaviviruses. Over the past 50 years, many population genetic studies have documented large genetic differences among global populations of this species. These studies initially used morphological polymorphisms, followed later by allozymes, and most recently various molecular genetic markers including microsatellites and mitochondrial markers. In particular, since 2000, fourteen publications and four unpublished datasets have used sequence data from the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 mitochondrial gene to compare Ae. aegypti collections and collectively 95 unique mtDNA haplotypes have been found. Phylogenetic analyses in these many studies consistently resolved two clades but no comprehensive study of mtDNA haplotypes have been made in Africa, the continent in which the species originated. Methods and Findings: ND4 haplotypes were sequenced in 426 Ae. aegypti s.l. from Senegal, West Africa and Kenya, East Africa. In Senegal 15 and in Kenya 7 new haplotypes were discovered. When added to the 95 published haplotypes and including 6 African Aedes species as outgroups, phylogenetic analyses showed that all but one Senegal haplotype occurred in a basal clade while most East African haplotypes occurred in a second clade arising from the basal clade. Globally distributed haplotypes occurred in both clades demonstrating that populations outside Africa consist of mixtures of mosquitoes from both clades. Conclusions: Populations of Ae. aegypti outside Africa consist of mosquitoes arising from one of two ancestral clades. One clade is basal and primarily associated with West Africa while the second arises from the first and contains primarily mosquitoes from East Africaen
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH [R01AI083368]; NIH-NIAID [U01 AI088647]en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLOSen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectyellow-fever mosquitoen
dc.subjectgenetic-structureen
dc.subjectoral infectionen
dc.subjectnuclear genomeen
dc.subjectdengueen
dc.subjectvectoren
dc.subjectsusceptibilityen
dc.subjectphylogeographyen
dc.subjectdipteraen
dc.subjectflowen
dc.titleDual African Origins of Global Aedes aegypti s.l. Populations Revealed by Mitochondrial DNAen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.notesSenegal collections were supported by NIH R01AI083368 to MS and WCB. This work was also funded in part by NIH-NIAID U01 AI088647. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en
dc.title.serialPLOS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002175en
dc.identifier.volume7en
dc.identifier.issue4en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.dcmitypeStillImageen
dc.identifier.pmid23638196en


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International