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dc.contributor.authorNol, Paulineen
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, Steven C.en
dc.contributor.authorRhyan, Jack C.en
dc.contributor.authorSriranganathan, Nammalwaren
dc.contributor.authorMcCollum, Matthew P.en
dc.contributor.authorHennager, Steven G.en
dc.contributor.authorPavuk, Alana A.en
dc.contributor.authorSprino, Phillip J.en
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Stephen M.en
dc.contributor.authorBerrier, Randall J.en
dc.contributor.authorSalman, Mo D.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T19:24:40Z
dc.date.available2019-11-01T19:24:40Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-10en
dc.identifier.issn2235-2988en
dc.identifier.other10en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/95232
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis) have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the development of effective disease management strategies for wild elk herds is of utmost importance, not only for the prevention of reintroduction of brucellosis to cattle, but also for the overall health of the Greater Yellowstone Area elk populations. In two studies, we evaluated the efficacy of B. abortus strain RB51 over-expressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase for protecting elk from infection and disease caused by B. abortus after experimental infection with a virulent B. abortus strain. Our data indicate that the recombinant vaccine does not protect elk against brucellosis. Further, work is needed for development of an effective brucellosis vaccine for use in elk.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States Department of AgricultureUnited States Department of Agriculture (USDA)en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiersen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectBrucella abortusen
dc.subjectRB51en
dc.subjectelken
dc.subjectwildlife vaccinationen
dc.subjectsuperoxide dismutaseen
dc.subjectO-side chainen
dc.subjectglycosyltransferaseen
dc.titleVaccination of Elk (Cervus canadensis) with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase and Glycosyltransferase Genes Does Not Induce Adequate Protection against Experimental Brucella abortus Challengeen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.notesThis research was funded by the United States Department of Agriculture.en
dc.title.serialFrontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiologyen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2016.00010en
dc.identifier.volume6en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.dcmitypeStillImageen
dc.identifier.pmid26904509en


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International