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dc.contributor.authorRosenbloom, Staci J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-06T14:41:45Z
dc.date.available2011-08-06T14:41:45Z
dc.date.issued2003-10-21en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-11022003-164328en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/9612
dc.description.abstractThe relationship expected to occur between a therapist and his or her clients is a fiduciary relationship, a relationship of special trust. Professional boundaries ensure that the needs of clients remain primary. However, boundary transgressions are inevitable. Unfortunately, boundary transgressions have the potential of exploiting clients. Most of what is known about boundary transgressions comes from the perspective of professionals. The literature reiterates the importance of educating the lay public about the dangers of boundary transgressions. This study experimentally examined what effect education specific to boundary transgressions has on the lay public's level of acceptance of boundary transgressions, as opposed to what effect general information about personal/family therapy has on the lay public'­s level of acceptance of boundary transgressions. Two hundred students from a southeastern university participated and read either general information pertaining to personal/family therapy, or specific information pertaining to boundary transgressions, prior to rating their level of acceptance of therapists transgressing boundaries with their clients. Independent sample t-tests determined there were statistical differences in mean ratings of acceptance of boundary transgressions between the groups. However, because the mean scores between the two groups were not much different, the results suggest that the lay public could benefit from a more comprehensive explanation of boundary transgressions.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartStaciRosenbloom.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjecttherapeutic relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectethics educationen_US
dc.subjectboundary transgressionsen_US
dc.subjectlay public's perspectiveen_US
dc.titleBoundary Transgressions in Therapeutic Relationshipsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Developmenten_US
dc.description.degreeMSen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMcCollum, Eric E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLocke, Lisa D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosen, Karen H.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-11022003-164328en_US
dc.date.sdate2003-11-02en_US
dc.date.rdate2003-11-12
dc.date.adate2003-11-12en_US


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