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dc.contributor.authorBee, Jennifer Lilineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-06T14:43:07Z
dc.date.available2011-08-06T14:43:07Z
dc.date.issued1999-07-14en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-11252003-164142en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/9634
dc.description.abstractEvery place on earth has a voice. This voice resonates from the shaping events that have long passed and the current conditions that continue to give each place its individual character. The voice continually evolves as the cycle of birth, death, and rebirth leaves its trace. This voice in its endless variety of forms expresses the beauty that is inherent within each and every location on earth. The potential of architecture is the translation of this voice into human terms and the formal declaration that we as humans play a meaningful part in the cycle. The guiding forms, surfaces, substances of architecture allow the human body to move in grace, unhindered, and inspires the mind to sense the essential connection between matter spirit; between the individual and the whole. The role of the architect is to become sensitive to this voice; to silence the mind enough to hear, and to respond to it in material form. The resulting dialogue between the edifice and the encompassing site reaches a certain completeness that enriches the living experience of the end user, bringing the wandering mind to the present long enough to inspire the thought that "I belong here, among all of this." The technical training required in order to gain an inherent understanding of structure and materials takes years of experience in the field of architecture. However, it has been the focus of my graduate career to further develop this sensitivity to the site and make my first attempts at formulating an architectural response, suggesting structures that could achieve this engagement with the end user and the site itself.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartampitheatre1.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectrocken_US
dc.subjectamphitheateren_US
dc.subjectplaceen_US
dc.subjectquarryen_US
dc.subjectamphitheatreen_US
dc.subjectsiteen_US
dc.subjectstoneen_US
dc.titleRebirth of a Rock: Pembroke Quarry Amphitheatreen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSarpaneva, Piaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalloway, William U.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPittman, V. Hunteren_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-11252003-164142en_US
dc.date.sdate2003-11-25en_US
dc.date.rdate2003-12-15
dc.date.adate2003-12-15en_US


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