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dc.contributor.authorMo, Fanen
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-06T09:01:34Z
dc.date.available2020-02-06T09:01:34Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-05
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:23853en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/96730
dc.description.abstractAccessibility plays an important role in a number of scientific fields, and significant advances in measuring accessibility have been made over the past two decades. However, since the comprehensive review of accessibility measures conducted by Geurs and van Wee in 2004, no attempt has been made to update their study. In addition, the emergence of Automated Vehicles (AVs) is expected to dramatically impact accessibility. Therefore, based on the relevant assessment criteria proposed by Geurs and van Wee (2004) (i.e., theoretical basis, interpretability, operationalization, and usability), this research reviews: (1) progress made over the past two decades on measuring accessibility; and (2) how accessibility measures have incorporated the impacts of AVs. A total of 495 papers and books were identified through a search of Scopus, Web of Science, and EBSCOhost in May 2019. The results found that the existing accessibility measures have been further refined, and new measures have been created by leveraging more advanced behavior theories and/or models. In addition, the operationalization of almost all of the measures has become easier due to more readily available data and more advanced implementation tools. As a result of these changes, accessibility measures are becoming more usable and can more accurately assess social, economic, and environmental impacts. However, the interpretation of these measures is becoming more difficult due to the incorporation of more complicated theories and models. Interestingly, very few papers discussed AVs in the context of accessibility measures. Finally, as a result of this study, future research opportunities are identified.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subjectAccessibility Measureen
dc.subjectAutomated Vehiclesen
dc.subjectTransportationen
dc.subjectPlanningen
dc.titleA systematic review of scientific literature on accessibility measurements and the treatment of automated vehiclesen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentUrban Affairs and Planningen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Urban and Regional Planningen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Urban and Regional Planningen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineUrban and Regional Planningen
dc.contributor.committeechairHall, Ralph P.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBieri, David Stephanen
dc.contributor.committeememberZhang, Wenwenen
dc.description.abstractgeneralThe concept of accessibility plays an important role in a number of scientific fields (e.g., transportation planning, environmental conservation, and economic development, etc.), and a change in accessibility can have a direct impact on an individual's quality of life. Transportation accessibility is a function of the connectivity between origins (e.g., a home) and destinations (e.g., a place of employment). Significant advances in measuring accessibility have been made over the past two decades. However, since the comprehensive review of accessibility measures conducted by Geurs and van Wee in 2004, no attempt has been made to update their study. In addition, the emergence of Automated Vehicles (AVs) is expected to dramatically impact accessibility. Therefore, based on the relevant assessment criteria proposed by Geurs and van Wee (2004) (i.e., theoretical basis, interpretability, operationalization, and usability), this research reviews: (1) progress made over the past two decades on measuring accessibility; and (2) how accessibility measures have incorporated the impacts of AVs. The theoretical basis refers to whether an accessibility measure is developed based on solid theories or models, and whether the measure is sensitive to: (a) opportunity changes (e.g., changes in the location of jobs); (b) transport cost changes (e.g., travel time changes); (c) temporal changes (e.g., the change of travel options throughout different times-of-day); and (d) individual changes (e.g., how residents' travel behavior changes due to the emergence of a new subway line). Interpretability refers to how easy an accessibility measure can be explained and understood by planners, engineers, and decision makers. Operationalization refers to how easy it is to use a measure in practice. Finally, usability refers to whether the results of an accessibility measure can be used to assess social, economic, and environmental impacts. A total of 495 papers and books were identified through a search of Scopus, Web of Science, and EBSCOhost in May 2019. The results found that existing accessibility measures have been further refined, and new measures have been created by leveraging more advanced behavior theories and/or models. In addition, the operationalization of almost all of the measures has become easier due to more readily available data and more advanced implementation tools. As a result of these changes, accessibility measures are becoming more usable and can more accurately assess social, economic, and environmental impacts. However, the interpretation of these measures is becoming more difficult due to the incorporation of more complicated theories and models. Interestingly, very few papers discussed AVs in the context of accessibility measures. Finally, as a result of this study, future research opportunities are identified.en


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