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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Anthony Fredericken_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-06T14:45:04Z
dc.date.available2011-08-06T14:45:04Z
dc.date.issued2003-12-19en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-01152004-194907en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/9693
dc.description.abstractThis work investigates the use of multi-degree of freedom (MDOF) passive and active vibration absorbers for the control of structural vibration as an improvement to conventional single degree of freedom (SDOF) vibration absorbers. An analytical model is first used to compare passive two degree of freedom (2DOF) absorbers to SDOF absorbers using point impedance as the performance criterion. The results show that one 2DOF absorber can provide the same impedance at two resonance frequencies as two SDOF absorbers for equal amounts of total mass. Experimental testing on a composite cylindrical shell supports the assertion that a 2DOF absorber can attenuate two resonance frequencies. Further modeling shows that MDOF absorbers can utilize the multiple mode shapes that correspond to their multiple resonance frequencies to couple into modes of a distributed primary system to improve the attenuation of structural resonance. By choosing the coupling positions of the MDOF absorber such that its mode shape mirrors that of the primary system, the mass of the absorber can be utilized at multiple resonance frequencies. For limited ranges of targeted resonance frequencies, this technique can result in MDOF absorbers providing attenuation equivalent to SDOF absorbers while using less mass. The advantage gained with the MDOF absorbers is dependent on the primary system. This work compares the advantage gained using the MDOF absorbers for three primary systems: MDOF lumped parameter systems, a pinned-pinned plate, and a cylindrical shell. The active vibration absorber study in this work is highly motivated by the desire to reduce structural vibration in a rocket payload fairing. Since the efficiency of acoustic foam is very poor at low frequencies, the target bandwidth was 50 to 200 Hz. A 2DOF active vibration absorber was desired to exhibit broad resonance characteristics over this frequency band. An analytical model was developed to facilitate the design of the mechanical and electrical properties of the 2DOF active vibration absorber, and is supported by experimental data. Eight active vibration absorbers were then constructed and used in a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) feed-forward control system on a mock payload fairing under high level acoustic excitation. The results show significant levels of global attenuation within the targeted frequency band.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis_rev1.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectactive controlen_US
dc.subjectvibration absorberen_US
dc.subjectmulti-degree of freedomen_US
dc.titleMulti-Degree of Freedom Passive and Active Vibration Absorbers for the Control of Structural Vibrationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairJohnson, Martin E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKidner, Michael R. F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarneal, James P.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-01152004-194907en_US
dc.date.sdate2004-01-15en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-01-28
dc.date.adate2004-01-28en_US


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