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dc.contributor.authorGosnell, Hailey L.
dc.contributor.authorKablinger, Anita S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-01T11:42:49Z
dc.date.available2020-06-01T11:42:49Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-27
dc.identifier.citationHailey L. Gosnell and Anita S. Kablinger, “A Case of Cachexia Secondary to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder,” Case Reports in Psychiatry, vol. 2020, Article ID 5783191, 4 pages, 2020. doi:10.1155/2020/5783191
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/98629
dc.description.abstractObsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a relatively common psychiatric illness, is diagnosed using DSM-V criteria. Its severity is assessed using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Symptoms are broken down into five categories of obsessive-compulsive (O-C) manifestations: contamination/cleaning, symmetry/ordering, taboo thoughts, doubt about harm/checking, and worry about throwing away items that could prove useful or valuable/hoarding. CBT in the form of exposure response therapy (ERP) and/or SSRI/clomipramine administration is the mainstay of treatment. We present a unique OCD case in the nature of obsessions and compulsions, cachexia presentation without anorexia, and history of multiple inpatient psychiatric admissions. Our patient’s obsessions focus on eating at specific times, prompting compulsive eating patterns that often result in starvation due to missing timeframes that the patient deems acceptable for eating. His resulting cachexia and eventual worsening of depression to the point of suicidality necessitated multiple inpatient stays and placement at a long-term mental health care facility.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherHindawien_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleA Case of Cachexia Secondary to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorderen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden_US
dc.date.updated2020-05-31T08:00:10Z
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2020 Hailey L. Gosnell and Anita S. Kablinger. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.title.serialCase Reports in Psychiatryen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1155/2020/5783191
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International