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dc.contributor.authorNissar, Nahmeden
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-25T17:45:49Z
dc.date.available2020-06-25T17:45:49Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-25
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:26931en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/99142
dc.description.abstractLandslides cause significant damage worldwide and therefore epitomize the most important problems in geotechnical engineering. Hence, perceiving the mechanics involved in the deformation process of landslides is necessary for risk assessment. In addition to the resistance offered by basal shear surfaces, internal shearing also influences the stability and kinematics of compound landslides. For compound landslides, internal shearing is essential to develop feasible sliding mechanisms. The internal distortion is caused by the formation of shear bands that develop within the sliding mass. The strain localization is generally attributed to slope changes along the basal sliding surface (or topography) that constrain the strain field of the landslide. The development of these internal shear bands also controls the energy dissipation, and its distribution determines the final degradation of the material. This work focuses on the study of internal failure mechanisms that develop in compound landslides. A theoretical model of a compound landslide is numerically analyzed using the Material Point Method (MPM), a state-of-the-art numerical technique appropriate to model large deformation problems. The internal failure pattern is identified for different basal sliding geometries. Based on that, a generalized method is proposed to estimate the internal failure mechanism of bi-planar compound geometries. The material degradation and energy dissipation are evaluated in terms of the accumulated deviatoric strain and the reaction forces exerted by the landslide on a vertical wall. Moreover, preliminary studies are conducted to analyze the use of barriers as a mitigation strategy to counter landslide damage, and their efficiencies are investigated.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en
dc.subjectCompound landslides; Material Point Method; Internal shearing; Barriersen
dc.titleAnalyzing internal shearing in compound landslides using MPMen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentCivil and Environmental Engineeringen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen
dc.contributor.committeechairYerro Colom, Albaen
dc.contributor.committeememberRodriguez-Marek, Adrianen
dc.contributor.committeememberDove, Joseph E.en
dc.description.abstractgeneralLandslides consist of movement of rock and debris down a slope. They cause substantial damage each year and therefore represent an important class of problems in geotechnical engineering. Understanding the deformation process and internal shearing pattern occurring in landslides is an important aspect for assessing the risk that a landslide poses. The internal shear is caused due to the formation of shear bands that develop within the mass flowing down the slope and originate at the points of slope change on an incline. These shear bands also affect the amount of energy dissipated and the degradation of flow material. In this work, the internal failure mechanism in landslides is analyzed and effects on landslide kinematics are studied. Material Point Method (MPM) is used to simulate slope instabilities which is an advanced numerical technique appropriate for modeling large deformation problems such as landslides. Several theoretical models of compound landslides are presented considering variation in geometry (roundedness), friction, and slope angle. A generalized failure mechanism of a landslide is proposed based on its geometry and physical parameters. Finally, accumulated strains and reaction forces impacted by moving mass on a wall are calculated for different landslide geometries, and subsequently correlated to energy dissipation material degradation. These results also serve as a precursor to studying the role of barriers in mitigating landslide damage.en


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