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dc.contributor.authorEbadi, Nasimen
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-09T08:00:33Zen
dc.date.available2020-07-09T08:00:33Zen
dc.date.issued2020-07-08en
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:26471en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/99304en
dc.description.abstractAgricultural production is an important source of environmental emissions. While water quality concerns related to animal agriculture have been studied extensively, air quality issues have become an increasing concern. Due to the transfer of nutrients between air, water, and soil, emissions to air can harm water quality. We conduct a multi-objective optimization analysis for a representative dairy farm with two different approaches: nonlinear programming (NLP) and ϵ-constraint optimization to evaluate trade-offs among reduction of multiple pollutants including nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), greenhouse gas (GHG), and ammonia. We evaluated twenty-six different scenar- ios in which we define incremental reductions of N, P, ammonia, and GHG from five to 25% relative to a baseline scenario. The farm entails crop production, livestock production (dairy and broiler), and manure management activities. Results from NLP optimization indicate that reducing P and ammonia emissions is relatively more expen- sive than N and GHG. This result is also confirmed by the ϵ-constraint optimization. However, the latter approach provides limited evidence of trade-offs among reduction of farm pollutants and net returns, while the former approach includes different re- duction scenarios that make trade-offs more evident. Results from both approaches indicate changes in crop rotation and land retirement are the best strategies to reduce N and P emissions while cow diet changes involving less forage represents the best strategy to reduce ammonia and GHG emissions.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectMulti-objective Optimizationen
dc.subjectNitrogenen
dc.subjectPhosphorusen
dc.subjectAmmoniaen
dc.subjectGreen House Gas (GHG)en
dc.subjectϵ-constraint Optimizationen
dc.subjectFarm Economicsen
dc.titleEstimating Costs of Reducing Environmental Emissions From a Dairy Farm: Multi-objective epsilon-constraint Optimization Versus Single Objective Constrained Optimizationen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentAgricultural and Applied Economicsen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Applied Economicsen
dc.contributor.committeechairBosch, Darrell J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberStephenson, Stephen Kurten
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Robin R.en
dc.description.abstractgeneralHuman activities often damage and deplete the environment. For instance, nutrient pollution into air and water, which mostly comes from agricultural and industrial activ- ities, results in water quality degradation. Thus, mitigating the detrimental impacts of human activities is an important step toward environmental sustainability. Reducing environmental impacts of nutrient pollution from agriculture is a complicated problem, which needs a comprehensive understanding of types of pollution and their reduction strategies. Reduction strategies need to be both feasible and financially viable. Con- sequently, practices must be carefully selected to allow farmers to maximize their net return while reducing pollution levels to reach a satisfactory level. Thus, this paper conducts a study to evaluate the trade-offs associated with farm net return and re- ducing the most important pollutants generated by agricultural activities. The results of this study show that reducing N and GHG emissions from a representative dairy farm is less costly than reducing P and ammonia emissions, respectively. In addition, reducing one pollutant may result in reduction of other pollutants. In general, for N and P emissions reduction land retirement and varying crop rotations are the most effective strategies. However, for reducing ammonia and GHG emissions focusing on cow diet changes involving less forage is the most effective strategy.en


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