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dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Ryan Keefeen
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-30T08:00:26Z
dc.date.available2020-07-30T08:00:26Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-29
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:27085en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/99453
dc.description.abstractThis thesis analyzes factors affecting adoption of integrated pest management (IPM) techniques by Kenyan vegetable farmers, including the role of their risk preferences. It also analyzes factors affecting their pesticide applications and expenditures. A survey was administered to 450 Kenyan vegetable growers to identify their pest management practices, and a behavioral experiment was run to elicit their risk preferences utilizing. Cumulative Prospect Theory. Loss aversion was found to be correlated with higher likelihood of IPM adoption while risk aversion was associated with higher pesticide application rates and expenditures. The influence of IPM adoption on pesticide use differed by IPM technique.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en
dc.subjectagricultural developmenten
dc.subjecttechnology adoptionen
dc.subjectKenyan agricultureen
dc.subjectKenyan horticultureen
dc.subjectIntegrated Pest Managementen
dc.subjectCumulative Prospect Theoryen
dc.subjectpoverty trapsen
dc.titleKenyan Vegetable Farmers' IPM adoption: barriers and impactsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentAgricultural and Applied Economicsen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Applied Economicsen
dc.contributor.committeechairNorton, George W.en
dc.contributor.committeememberAlwang, Jeffrey R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMills, Bradford F.en
dc.description.abstractgeneralIntegrated Pest Management (IPM) techniques can improve small holder farmers' livelihoods by lowering production costs and decreasing dependence on chemical pesticides. Even though some IPM techniques have been available to Kenyan vegetable farmers since the 1990's, IPM adoption remains relatively low while chemical pesticide use remains high. A farm-household survey and behavioral experiment were conducted to identify factors that influence farmer decisions to adopt IPM and to apply pesticides. Factors that influence IPM adoption were found to differ from those that influence pesticide decisions. Furthermore, IPM adoption by Kenyan farmers does not decrease use of chemical pesticides for all IPM techniques.en


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