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dc.contributorVirginia Tech
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, J. B.
dc.contributor.authorMuheim, R.
dc.contributor.authorJorge, P. E.
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-07T18:29:40Z
dc.date.available2014-02-07T18:29:40Z
dc.date.issued2010-10
dc.identifier.citationPhillips, John B.; Muheim, Rachel; Jorge, Paulo E., "A behavioral perspective on the biophysics of the light-dependent magnetic compass: a link between directional and spatial perception?," J Exp Biol 213, 3247-3255 (2010); doi: 10.1242/_jeb.020792
dc.identifier.issn0022-0949
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/25346
dc.description.abstractIn terrestrial organisms, sensitivity to the Earth's magnetic field is mediated by at least two different magnetoreception mechanisms, one involving biogenic ferromagnetic crystals (magnetite/maghemite) and the second involving a photo-induced biochemical reaction that forms long-lasting, spin-coordinated, radical pair intermediates. In some vertebrate groups (amphibians and birds), both mechanisms are present; a light-dependent mechanism provides a directional sense or 'compass', and a non-light-dependent mechanism underlies a geographical-position sense or 'map'. Evidence that both magnetite-and radical pair-based mechanisms are present in the same organisms raises a number of interesting questions. Why has natural selection produced magnetic sensors utilizing two distinct biophysical mechanisms? And, in particular, why has natural selection produced a compass mechanism based on a light-dependent radical pair mechanism (RPM) when a magnetite-based receptor is well suited to perform this function? Answers to these questions depend, to a large degree, on how the properties of the RPM, viewed from a neuroethological rather than a biophysical perspective, differ from those of a magnetite-based magnetic compass. The RPM is expected to produce a light-dependent, 3-D pattern of response that is axially symmetrical and, in some groups of animals, may be perceived as a pattern of light intensity and/or color superimposed on the visual surroundings. We suggest that the light-dependent magnetic compass may serve not only as a source of directional information but also provide a spherical coordinate system that helps to interface metrics of distance, direction and spatial position.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation IOB 06-47188, IOB 07-48175
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCompany of Biologists Ltd.
dc.subjectmagnetic compass
dc.subjectradical pair mechanism
dc.subjectspatial cognition
dc.subjectsubicular
dc.subjectplace cells
dc.subjectHIPPOCAMPAL PLACE CELLS
dc.subjectRADICAL-PAIR MECHANISM
dc.subjectPHOTORECEPTOR-BASED
dc.subjectMAGNETORECEPTION
dc.subjectNEWT NOTOPHTHALMUS-VIRIDESCENS
dc.subjectBLUE-LIGHT
dc.subjectPATH-INTEGRATION
dc.subjectCHEMICAL MAGNETORECEPTION
dc.subjectINCLINATION COMPASS
dc.subjectVESTIBULAR INPUT
dc.subjectMIGRATORY BIRDS
dc.titleA behavioral perspective on the biophysics of the light-dependent magnetic compass: a link between directional and spatial perception?
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.urlhttp://jeb.biologists.org/content/213/19/3247.full.pdf+html
dc.date.accessed2014-02-04
dc.title.serialJournal of Experimental Biology
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.020792


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