VTechWorks

VTechWorks provides global access to Virginia Tech scholarship, including journal articles, books, theses, dissertations, conference papers, slide presentations, technical reports, working papers, administrative documents, videos, images, and more by faculty, students, and staff. Faculty can deposit items to VTechWorks from Elements, including journal articles covered by the University open access policy. Email vtechworks@vt.edu for help.


 
Open Access Policy

Open Access Policy

Virginia Tech's open access policy enables researchers to deposit the accepted version of scholarly articles with no embargo.


Theses and Dissertations

Theses and Dissertations

Virginia Tech was first in the world to require ETDs in 1997, and continues to add scans of older theses and dissertations.


Open Textbooks

Open Textbooks

More than 40 freely available and openly licensed textbooks are among our most downloaded items.


Recent Submissions

Influence of Plasma Trails from Hypersonic Events on HF Radar Data Capture
Stewart, Evan Wayne (Virginia Tech, 2024-06-13)
Meteors enter earth's atmosphere with a great amount of kinetic energy. As a result of this atmospheric contact, many meteors will be burned up before they can make it to earth's surface, but not before they cause atmospheric disturbances. The SuperDARN HF radar is designed to measure the ionosphere, typically to create hemisphere wide maps of ionospheric plasma convection, but meteor events are attributed to noise experienced in its data. This thesis first brings together plasma physics understanding with currently available research to clarify the physical behaviors that must be considered to evaluate radar data. The implications of this towards SuperDARN findings is examined in two parts. First, how a meteor's atmospheric interaction is recorded by the SuperDARN HF radar is evaluated. To do this, the physical interaction the meteor has with the atmosphere is examined from the sub-atomic to atmospheric scale. Previous research that used other radars to find these interactions is analyzed to create an understanding of a possible SuperDARN HF radar outcome and provide a new comparison of radars. This understanding is compared against meteor event and location based SuperDARN data to select an optimal event. The second part of the SuperDARN analysis reviews meteor event options based on the time and location of a meteor event meeting defined parameters. Common SuperDARN analysis tools are applied. The data saved by SuperDARN is examined for unique results. Finally, the practicality and meaning of results is considered.
Smiling Under the Mask: How Emotional Labor Shapes Restaurant Workers' Experiences during COVID
Thompson, Victoria Isabelle (Virginia Tech, 2024-06-13)
This study examines whether front-of-house workers' experiences of emotional labor affected their turnover intentions while working a food service job during COVID. To investigate, I asked a sample of 14 tipped workers and two general managers about their experiences working in restaurants during the lockdown and reopening phases of COVID. I learned about participants' experiences working and their reasons for staying and quitting their job during the reopening phases. From interviews, I collected data on workers' perceptions of health mandates, their customer interactions, and their own assessments of COVID-related risks. I analyzed interview data to assess how organizational changes during COVID affected workers' performances of emotional labor and whether their reasons for leaving related to emotional labor being altered. Findings show that workers had to manage customers' heightened emotions while handling their own. From decreased income, increased negative emotions, and mask interference, workers' experiences of emotional labor were significantly changed. Importantly, organizational changes made many workers uncomfortable in their workplace and in following organizational demands, both related and unrelated to emotional labor. These experiences led seven participants to ultimately quit and six to desire to quit without doing so. I conclude that emotional labor was intensified for workers' whose wage predominantly rested on their capitalization of interactions with customers. Evidence reveals how organizational changes led to increased feelings of stress, emotional burnout, and exhaustion. However, the widespread occurrence of these feelings and intensified emotional labor make it unclear whether increased and intensified emotional labor directly created or heavily influenced desires to quit.
Rain Transit in Detroit
Collins, Jonah; Gorman, Joseph; Oredipe, Albert; Podolny, Eric (2024-05-01)
The city of Detroit grapples with entrenched issues stemming from its historical reliance on automobiles. This dependency has exacerbated health and socioeconomic disparities, hindering community cohesion and mobility. Our project proposes a comprehensive rail-based solution to alleviate these challenges. By prioritizing safety, affordability, and reliability, we aim to foster a transit environment less dominated by cars, promoting environmental sustainability and equity. Detroit's current transit infrastructure inadequately serves its population, with low ridership due to unreliable bus systems. Our proposal advocates for light rail transit to enhance public mobility while reducing traffic congestion and air pollution. By connecting diverse communities and mitigating urban sprawl effects, our plan seeks to address longstanding inequities. Central to our approach is a dual focus on climate and community development. We define community inclusively, encompassing Detroit's diverse populace, and prioritize local investment to bolster economic resilience. Concurrently, we aim to curb carbon emissions through transit alternatives, aligning with broader climate mitigation efforts. Acknowledging Detroit's economic struggles, we recognize the project's significant cost. However, we assert that light rail offers unparalleled efficiency and comfort over long distances, attracting riders and catalyzing development. Leveraging existing infrastructure and collaborative partnerships, our phased expansion plan aims to bridge residential and commercial areas, enhancing accessibility and economic vitality. Drawing from successful models like Charlotte, North Carolina, we envision mixed-use developments along transit corridors, bolstering economic prosperity. Yet, we remain mindful of potential gentrification risks and prioritize inclusive growth strategies. Together with statewide transit initiatives, our project aligns with Detroit's vision for equitable urban development. By providing a robust, sustainable transit network, we aspire to transform Detroit into a more connected, prosperous, and resilient city for all its residents.
Food Insecurity in Appalachia
Mehta, Kareena; Sumner, Dani; Utton, Lydia; Webb, Erika (2024-05-01)
This paper serves to explore the multifaceted complexities of food insecurity in the Appalachian region. This paper will delve into the current converse impacts food insecurity has in the areas of environment, health, government, socio-cultural practices, spatial built environments, non-profit organizations, and economics. This paper also features a review of the complex system of Appalachian food insecurity and an understanding of how community wealth building as an economic framework can influence and intervene in the current system’s leverage points. Through a comprehensive analysis of the available literature and a recommendation of influenceable leverage points this paper seeks to synthesize and inform a target audience of stakeholders such as policymakers, educators, non-profit organizers, and community members to remedy the issue of Appalachian food insecurity and recognize this problem not a uniform, isolates issue but as a broader system of disparities impacted by existing economic models and community practices.