Now showing items 1-11 of 11

    • 1991 federal regulations for drug residues in milk 

      Jones, G. M. (Gerald Murray), 1941-; Bishop, Jay Russell, 1955- (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1992)
      Discusses federal standards and regulations for milk quality and the proper use and storage of animal drugs on dairy farms.
    • Cleaning and sanitizing milking equipment 

      Jones, G. M. (Gerald Murray), 1941- (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1992)
      All milking machine equipment that come in contact with milk, dirt or manure must be thoroughly cleaned and sanitized before the next milking.
    • Cystic ovaries in dairy cows 

      Nebel, Raymond Lee, 1953- (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1994)
      Although cystic ovarian disease is one of the oldest recorded diseases in dairy cattle, it remains a major problem in many dairies.
    • Dairy loafing lot rotational management system 

      Swisher, Jerry M., 1949-; White, Harlan E.; Carr, Scott B., 1934- (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1994)
      Discusses the benefits and concerns of a dairy "loafing lot". Describes how to develop a loafing lot and management of the lot by rotation.
    • Fat-corrected milk 

      Cassell, Bennet G. (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1992)
      Fat-corrected milk is one method of standardizing milk production for comparisons between cows.
    • Handling mastitis problem herds 

      Jones, G. M. (Gerald Murray), 1941- (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1992)
      Mastitis prevention is the most important ingredient in mastitis control. Preventative measures include attention to all details.
    • Improved foot health : genetic and management implications 

      Cassell, Bennet G. (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1995)
      This guideline presents research results about the role of genetics in foot structure and proposes alternatives to heavy emphasis on foot shape in sire selection.
    • Pre-dipping : pre-milking disinfection with teat dip 

      Jones, G. M. (Gerald Murray), 1941- (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1992)
      Most mastitis is caused by microbial penetration of the teat. The use of pre-dipping should be considered for herds that are experiencing problems.
    • Stray electricity on dairy farms 

      Jones, G. M. (Gerald Murray), 1941- (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1992)
      Small electrical currents may come in contact with dairy cows and may cause significant losses in milk production as well as certain health problems.
    • Streptococcal mastitis 

      Jones, G. M. (Gerald Murray), 1941- (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1992)
      For years, streptococci were the most prevalent causes of mastitis. This publication discusses Strep agalacitiae, Strep uberis, and Strep dysgalactiae.
    • The role of milking equipment in mastitis 

      Jones, G. M. (Gerald Murray), 1941- (Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1999)
      Milking machines may adversely affect udder health by damaging or changing the teat skin, teat canal, or mucosal tissue. Milking systems tests should be conducted on a regular basis.