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dc.contributor.authorTrulove, Susanen_US
dc.coverage.spatialBlacksburg, Va.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-29T21:39:45Z
dc.date.available2015-10-29T21:39:45Z
dc.date.issued2010-01-12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/62828
dc.description.abstractIn an age when bacterial agents may be intentionally released as method of terrorist attack, there is an increased need for quick diagnostic methods that require limited resources and personnel. Thomas Inzana, the Tyler J. and Frances F. Young Chair of Bacteriology in the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech, has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop such a diagnostic test.en_US
dc.format.mimetypetext/htmlen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Tech. University Relationsen_US
dc.rightsIn Copyright (InC)en_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s). For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectVirginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicineen_US
dc.titleResearchers developing nanoscale optical fibers to detect bioterrorist agentsen_US
dc.typePress releaseen_US
dc.rights.holderVirginia Tech. University Relationsen_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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