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dc.contributorVirginia Tech. Department of Computer Scienceen_US
dc.contributorFlorida State University. School of Informationen_US
dc.contributorLouisiana State University. School of Library and Information Science. Center for Computation and Technologyen_US
dc.contributorUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. School of Information and Library Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.authorOh, Sangheeen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Seungwonen_US
dc.contributor.authorPomerantz, Jeffrey P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWildemuth, Barbara M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFox, Edward A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-16T08:03:29Z
dc.date.available2016-02-16T08:03:29Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-20
dc.identifier.citationOh, S., Yang, S., Pomerantz, J. P., Wildemuth, B. M., & Fox, E. A. (2015). Results of a digital library curriculum field test. International Journal on Digital Libraries, 1-14. doi:10.1007/s00799-015-0151-en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-1300
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/64823
dc.description.abstractThe DL Curriculum Development project was launched in 2006, responding to an urgent need for consensus on DL curriculum across the fields of computer science and information and library science. Over the course of several years, 13 modules of a digital libraries (DL) curriculum were developed and were ready for field testing. The modules were evaluated in DL courses in real classroom environments in 37 classes by 15 instructors and their students. Interviews with instructors and questionnaires completed by their students were used to collect evaluative feedback. Findings indicate that the modules have been well designed to educate students on important topics and issues in DLs, in general. Suggestions to improve the modules based on the interviews and questionnaires were discussed as well. After the field test, module development has been continued, not only for the DL community but also others associated with DLs, such as information retrieval, big data, and multimedia. Currently, 56 modules are readily available for use through the project website or the Wikiversity site.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipIIS-0535057en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hillen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipIIS-0535060en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Justiceen_US
dc.description.sponsorship2009-DN-BX-K229en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech. Open Access Subvention Funden_US
dc.format.extent14 p.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectDigital librariesen_US
dc.subjectCurriculum evaluationen_US
dc.subjectEducational resourcesen_US
dc.subjectComputer scienceen_US
dc.subjectInformation scienceen_US
dc.titleResults of a digital library curriculum field testen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden_US
dc.rights.holderOh, Sangheeen_US
dc.rights.holderYang, Seungwonen_US
dc.rights.holderPomerantz, Jeffrey P.en_US
dc.rights.holderWildemuth, Barbara M.en_US
dc.rights.holderFox, Edward A.en_US
dc.identifier.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00799-015-0151-5
dc.date.accessed2016-02-12
dc.title.serialInternational Journal on Digital Librariesen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00799-015-0151-5
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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