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dc.contributor.authorWei, Haoranen_US
dc.contributor.authorHossein Abtahi, Seyyed M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVikesland, Peter J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-18T22:24:55Z
dc.date.available2016-03-18T22:24:55Z
dc.date.issued2015-03-10
dc.identifier.citationWei, H., Hossein Abtahi, S. M., & Vikesland, P. J. (2015). Plasmonic colorimetric and SERS sensors for environmental analysis. Environmental Science: Nano, 2(2), 120-135. doi:10.1039/C4EN00211Cen_US
dc.identifier.issn2051-8153en_US
dc.identifier.other2015_Wei_Plasmonic_colorimetric_and_SERS_senso.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.otherCBET 1236005en_US
dc.identifier.otherCBET 1133736en_US
dc.identifier.otherEF-0830093en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/64965
dc.description.abstractThe potential for water pollution outbreaks requires the development of rapid, yet simple detection methods for water quality monitoring. Plasmonic nanostructures such as gold (AuNPs) and silver (AgNPs) nanoparticles are compelling candidates for the development of highly sensitive biosensors due to their unique localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs). The LSPR of AuNPs and AgNPs lies in the visible and infrared light range and is sensitive to the composition, size, shape, surrounding medium, and aggregation state of these NPs. This plasmonic behavior provides the basis for fabrication of colorimetric sensors for environmental analyses. Furthermore, the LSPR also enhances the electromagnetic field near the NP surface, which provides the basis for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based detection. Organic or inorganic pollutants and pathogens can be detected and differentiated based upon the finger-print spectra that arise when they enter SERS-active hot spots. In this tutorial review, we summarize progress made towards environmental analysis based on LSPR-based colorimetric and SERS detection. The problems and challenges that have hindered the development of LSPR-based nanosensors for real-world environmental pollutant monitoring are extensively discussed.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (U.S.)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Scienceen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech. Graduate School. Sustainable Nanotechnology Interdisciplinary Graduate Education Program (VTSuN IGEP)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States. Environmental Protection Agencyen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCenter for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnologyen_US
dc.format.extent16 pagesen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Society of Chemistryen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/*
dc.titlePlasmonic colorimetric and SERS sensors for environmental analysisen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden_US
dc.contributor.departmentVirginia Tech. Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentVirginia Tech. Institute of Critical Technology and Applied Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDuke University. Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnologyen_US
dc.description.notes2015 Royal Society of Chemistry Open Access Gold Articleen_US
dc.date.accessed2016-03-17en_US
dc.title.serialEnvironmental Science: Nanoen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1039/C4EN00211C
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


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