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dc.contributor.authorDixon, R.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, J.en
dc.contributor.authorGuill, S.en
dc.coverage.spatialAfricaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T18:55:03Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T18:55:03Zen
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier677en
dc.identifier.citationMitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change 8(2): 93-113en
dc.identifier.issn1381-2386en
dc.identifier.issn1573-1596en
dc.identifier.other677_CR_00013.pdfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/65729en
dc.description.abstractDonor countries are providing financial and technical support for global climate change country studies to help African nations meet their reporting needs under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Technical assistance to complete vulnerability and adaptation assessments includes training of analysts, sharing of contemporary tools (e.g. simulation models), data and assessment techniques, information-sharing workshops and an international exchange programme for analysts. This chapter summarizes 14 African country studies (Botswana, Cote d'Ivoire, Egypt, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Kenya, Malawi, Mauritius, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) assessing vulnerabilities to global climate change and identifying adaptation options. The analysis revealed that the participating African countries are vulnerable to global climate change in more than one of the following socio-economic sectors: coastal resources, agriculture, grasslands and livestock, water resources, forests, wildlife, and human health. This vulnerability is exacerbated by widespread poverty, recurrent droughts, inequitable land distribution, environmental degradation, natural resource mismanagement and dependence on rain-fed agriculture. A range of practical adaptation options were identified in key socio-economic sectors of the African nations analysed. However, underdeveloped human and institutional capacity, as well as the absence of adequate infrastructure, renders many traditional coping strategies (rooted in political and economic stability) ineffective or insufficient. Future African country studies should be more closely coordinated with development of national climate change action plans.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherBerlin, Germany: Springer Science+Business Media B.V.en
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectSocial impactsen
dc.subjectHumid zonesen
dc.subjectWildlifeen
dc.subjectSemiarid zonesen
dc.subjectSustainable developmenten
dc.subjectEconomic analysesen
dc.subjectEnvironmental impactsen
dc.subjectTropical zonesen
dc.subjectSubhumid zonesen
dc.subjectSubtropicsen
dc.subjectWateren
dc.subjectEconomic impactsen
dc.subjectForestsen
dc.subjectHealth impactsen
dc.subjectResource management toolsen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectAgricultureen
dc.subjectAdaptationen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectGlobal climate changeen
dc.subjectVulnerabilityen
dc.subjectEcosystem Farm/Enterprise Scale Field Scale Governance Watersheden
dc.titleLife on the edge: Vulnerability and adaptation of African ecosystems to global climate changeen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2003 by Springer. Part of Springer Science+Business Mediaen
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1023/A:1026001626076en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten


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