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dc.contributor.authorFood and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.‏ United Nations Development Programme
dc.coverage.spatialAfrica
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T18:56:18Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T18:56:18Z
dc.date.issued1996
dc.identifier1445
dc.identifier.citationWorld Animal Review 87: 9-16
dc.identifier.issn1014-6954
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/66153
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractThe promotion of commercial livestock husbandry has long been seen as a means of destocking African rangelands and increasing livestock output through increased offtake. This paper argues that commercialization does exact a long-term downward pressure on African stocking densities, which will make many policy makers, administrators, and range scientists happy. However, the shift form subsistence to market-oriented forms of range livestock husbandry also exerts downward pressure on total rangeland output and undermines the capacity of rangelands to support human populations, a possibility that is no likely to be warmly welcomed by displaced pastoralists.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRome: FAO
dc.subjectCommercialization
dc.subjectGovernment policy
dc.subjectLivestock fattening
dc.subjectRangelands
dc.subjectPastoralism
dc.subjectLivestock
dc.subjectStocking rate
dc.subjectStocking density
dc.subjectEcosystem
dc.titleStocking rates for African pastoral systems
dc.typeAbstract
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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