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dc.contributor.authorGarcía, A.M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T20:08:06Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T20:08:06Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier4753
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine 44(6): 584-594
dc.identifier.issn1097-0274
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/68990
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractThe author argues that pesticides effect human health in many similar ways for males and females, but the differences in biology makes women more susceptible to the toxicity of certain chemicals and different cancers can actually be produced depending on gender from exposure to the same agricultural inputs because they function as an endocrine disruptor and develop hormone-related cancers that affect women more than men. This is important because in the agricultural labor force of developing countries 44% are women, compared to only 36% women in developed countries (p. 585-586). The author found that knowledge and attitudes about pesticides differed greatly between women and men, with women knowing less and protecting themselves less regarding pesticides. Women were found to be affected not only by spraying pesticides but by living in areas where pesticides are sprayed, particularly in their reproductive functions and birth defects of children. Reproductive functions and birth defects are also greatly affected by water contamination.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2003 A.M. Garcia
dc.subjectPesticide poisoning
dc.subjectWomen
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectPesticides
dc.subjectExposure
dc.subjectWomen's health
dc.subjectReproduction
dc.subjectFarm/Enterprise Scale
dc.titlePesticide exposure and women's health
dc.typeAbstract
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.10256
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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