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dc.contributor.authorSchak, Oliveren
dc.contributor.authorBentley, Charlieen
dc.contributor.authorNichols, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorWil Del Pilaren
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-19T19:56:10Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-19T19:56:10Zen
dc.date.issued2019-09-11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/96050en
dc.description.abstractWhen it comes to enrolling and graduating Latinos, and at a time when the population of Latinos in the U.S. is fast increasing, public colleges and universities in most states are flunking. This report details how much work states have to do to increase the population of Latinos with a college degree, from enrolling proportional numbers of Latinos in community colleges and four-year colleges and universities to ensuring Latinos are just as likely as their White peers to cross the finish line once they start college.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Education Trusten
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Education Trusten
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectcommunity collegesen
dc.subjectLatin American studentsen
dc.subjectacademic achievement gapen
dc.titleBroken Mirrors: Latino Student Representation at Public State Colleges and Universitiesen
dc.typeReporten
dc.date.accessed2019-10-23en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttps://s3-us-east-2.amazonaws.com/edtrustmain/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/10123122/Broken-Mirrors-Latino-Student-Representation-at-State-Public-Colleges-and-Universities-September-2019.pdfen


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International