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dc.contributor.authorCarnevale, Anthony P.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorPeltier Campbell, Kathrynen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-19T19:57:03Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-19T19:57:03Zen
dc.date.issued2019en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/96144en
dc.description.abstractIn this report, the authors explore how sex, age, income, race, and political affiliation might influence opinions regarding women’s suitability to be president. They also explore whether educational attainment levels might lead to broader options for political leadership by reducing bias that could limit the candidate pool.en
dc.description.sponsorshipGeorgetown University Center on Education and the Workforceen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University Center on Education and the Workforceen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjecteducation, higher--government policyen
dc.subjecteducational attainmenten
dc.subjectwomen in higher educationen
dc.subjectacademic achievement gapen
dc.titleMay the Best Woman Win?: Education and Bias against Women in American Politicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.date.accessed2019-10-25en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttps://1gyhoq479ufd3yna29x7ubjn-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/Women_in_Politics.pdfen


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International