Social capital or analytical liability? Social networks and African informal economies

dc.contributor.authorMeagher, K.en
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.coverage.spatialAfricaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T19:30:47Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T19:30:47Zen
dc.date.issued2005en
dc.descriptionMetadata only recorden
dc.description.abstractThe article argues that observing African informal economies networks under a 'social capitalist' paradigm have prevented us from understanding the multidimensional characteristics of African informal economies. Advantages of networks on the African informal economies go beyond the binary social capitalistic concept of bonds and bridges. African networks in this context include both the past with its legacies and the present with its changes. African networks are based on ethnicity, religion, class, and gender. Solidarity cooperation improves economic efficiency by reducing the costs of economic organizations such as credit, labour, training, and referrals. Both weak and strong ties play a crucial role providing social support.en
dc.format.mimetypetext/plainen
dc.identifier3173en
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Networks 5(3): 217-238en
dc.identifier.issn1470-2266en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/67323en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherOxford, UK: Blackwell Publishingen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd & Global Networks Partnershipen
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectReligionen
dc.subjectEthnicity/raceen
dc.subjectSocial capitalen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectInformal economiesen
dc.subjectNetworksen
dc.subjectSolidarity cooperationen
dc.subjectClassen
dc.titleSocial capital or analytical liability? Social networks and African informal economiesen
dc.typeAbstracten
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
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