Host species affects herbivory, pollination, and reproduction in experiments with parasitic castilleja

dc.contributorVirginia Techen
dc.contributor.authorAdler, Lynn S.en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological Sciencesen
dc.date.accessed2014-03-11en
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-27T13:06:04Zen
dc.date.available2014-03-27T13:06:04Zen
dc.date.issued2003-08en
dc.description.abstractThe relative performance of a parasitic plant on different host species will depend on both direct and indirect effects of hosts on parasite interactions with mutualists and antagonists. Host species could affect parasite interactions with both herbivores and pollinators due to the uptake of defensive compounds and nutrients. However, the effects of different host species on parasitic plants have not been experimentally tested in the field. I determined the effect of two native host species, an alkaloid-producing, nitrogen-fixing lupine and non-alkaloid, non-nitrogen-fixing grass, on herbivory, pollination, and reproduction of the hemiparasitic plant Indian paintbrush (Castilleja indivisa). Within this experiment, I manipulated herbivory and pollination to determine their effects on Indian paintbrush reproduction. Indian paintbrush parasitizing lupines produced three times as many seeds and were more attractive to pollinators than Indian paintbrush parasitizing grass. However, there was no effect of host species on early season or floral herbivory. In addition, MANOVA revealed that host species influenced the response of Indian paintbrush female reproduction to experimentally manipulated herbivory and pollination treatments. Thus, the effect of hosts on parasites is mediated by interactions with herbivores and pollinators, and both direct and indirect effects may shape the selective pressures mediating interactions between hosts and parasites.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCenter for Population Biology Research Awarden
dc.description.sponsorshipJastro-Shields Research Award (at the University of California at Davis)en
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Xi Grants-in-Aid of Researchen
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowshipen
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant DEB98-00885en
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Biology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.en
dc.identifier.citationLynn S. Adler 2003. HOST SPECIES AFFECTS HERBIVORY, POLLINATION, AND REPRODUCTION IN EXPERIMENTS WITH PARASITIC CASTILLEJA. Ecology 84:2083-2091. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/02-0542en
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1890/02-0542en
dc.identifier.issn0012-9658en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/46839en
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.esajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1890/02-0542en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherEcological Society of Americaen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectandropogon gerardiien
dc.subjectcastilleja indivisaen
dc.subjectdiffuse coevolutionen
dc.subjectindianen
dc.subjectpaintbrushen
dc.subjectindirect effectsen
dc.subjectlupinus texensisen
dc.subjectnitrogen fixationen
dc.subjectparasitismen
dc.subjecttritrophic interactionsen
dc.subjectfacultative root hemiparasitesen
dc.subjectrhinanthus-minoren
dc.subjectquinolizidineen
dc.subjectalkaloidsen
dc.subjectlocal adaptationen
dc.subjectsecondary metabolitesen
dc.subjectdiffuse coevolutionen
dc.subjectcuscuta-europaeaen
dc.subjectplant-resistanceen
dc.subjectwild radishen
dc.subjectseed seten
dc.titleHost species affects herbivory, pollination, and reproduction in experiments with parasitic castillejaen
dc.title.serialEcologyen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
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