"Ghost river": The Columbia

dc.contributor.authorGayton, D.en
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T19:11:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T19:11:17Zen
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.descriptionMetadata only recorden
dc.description.abstractThis perspective piece examines the history and geography of the Columbia River and some current ecosystem management issues related to hydroelectric development on the river. Once the greatest salmon producer in the word, the Columbia has, according to the author, become a "ghost river," with its salmon runs reduced to remnants, and its ecological integrity hanging in the balance. The author suggests that British Columbians have much to lose, both biologically and culturally should this river ecosystem collapse. While the river will probably never flow freely again, the author maintains that it will be a test of our commitment to energy conservation and of our biological ingenuity, to bring the Columbia back from its current "ghost" status.en
dc.format.mimetypetext/plainen
dc.identifier1555en
dc.identifier.citationBC Journal of Ecosystems and Management 1(2): 130-133en
dc.identifier.issn1488-4666en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/66550en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherKamloops, BC: FORREX-Forest Research Extension Partnershipen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.forrex.org/publications/jem/ISS14/vol1_no2_art7.pdfen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2001 by FORREX Forest Research Extension Partnershipen
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectEcosystem managementen
dc.subjectEcosystemen
dc.subjectSemiarid zonesen
dc.subjectAquatic ecosystemsen
dc.subjectTemperate zonesen
dc.subjectWater managementen
dc.subjectWatershed managementen
dc.subjectNatural resource managementen
dc.subjectEcosystem Watersheden
dc.title"Ghost river": The Columbiaen
dc.typeAbstracten
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
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