Center Publications, Center for Gerontology

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  • Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): What do we do now?
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2006-10)
    This brochure provides information about mild cognitive impairment, including how to recognize the condition, seek medical help, and coping strategies for patients and families.
  • Helping a Friend/Helping Yourself: Intimate Partner Violence & Rural Older Women
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2010)
    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is physical, emotional, psychological, or sexual abuse by a husband, boyfriend or other intimate partner. IPV may include harsh or cruel criticism, threats of abandonment, intentional isolation from family and friends, limits on the use of the phone, and denying medical treatment or medications in addition to physical abuse. IPV affects women of all ages regardless of income, education, residence, or social status. Older women often keep IPV hidden from family and friends at the expense of their health, wellbeing, and quality of life.
  • Intimate Partner Violence and Rural Older Women IPV Resource List
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2010)
    A list of academic resources and websites about intimate partner violence.
  • Intimate Partner Violence & Rural Older Women NRV Community Referral List
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2010)
    A list of community resources and phone numbers for victims of intimate partner violence and community professionals.
  • Overview: Intimate Partner Violence & Rural Older Women
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2010)
    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is defined as physical, sexual, or psychological abuse by a spouse, boyfriend, or intimate partner. It is a hidden public health problem, touching nearly one third of all women aged 50+ each year. IPV occurs regardless of income, education, residence, or social status. Older women experiencing IPV are adept at keeping their abuse hidden at the expense of their health, wellbeing, and quality of life. This shroud of silence surrounding IPV in late life is largely attributed to traditional and cultural ideology that prevents them from seeking help or seeing themselves as victims.
  • Intimate Partner Violence & Rural Older Women Fact Sheet
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2010)
    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is defined as physical, sexual, or psychological abuse by a spouse, boyfriend, or intimate partner. For older victims of IPV, statistics are not readily available because domestic violence data are generally not specific to violence in later life and elder abuse statistics do not specify abuse by a spouse or intimate partner. Furthermore, older abused women are thus less likely to report abuse to the authorities 1 out of shame, embarrassment, and social expectations to manage family matters privately. Yet, studies on IPV in later life indicate it is a hidden public health problem affecting nearly one‐third of all women ages 50+ each year. The following data offers a glimpse into the prevalence of IPV at the national, state, and local level.
  • Professional Response: Intimate Partner Violence & Rural Older Women
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2010)
    This brochure provides information for community professionals on how to identify and support victims of intimate partner violence.
  • Improving Quality: A Guide For Virginia's Personal Care Providers
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2005-08)
    The goals of every business are to grow and prosper while providing the best services possible. The challenges of providing routine care and meeting the needs of regulations become easier when systems designed to enhance quality are in place. Unmet needs and challenges faced by recipients and providers are reduced to a more manageable size, thus increasing recipient satisfaction with services provided and quality of life. A commitment to quality will help make your business competitive, maximize your resources, and raise customer and employee satisfaction. No matter the size of the business you operate, quality assurance strategies are simple to use. The cost of making changes shouldbe related to agency processes and how staff members perform tasks, not finances. Within this brochure you will find helpful hints on how to implement strategies to help enhance your agency's services.
  • Professional Caregivers: What You Can Do to Prevent Falls in Older Adults
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2013-10)
    Falling is a major public health concern for older adults. One in 3 adults aged 65+ and 1 in 2 adults aged 80+ fall each year, often suffering major changes to health and quality of life. Unintentional falls and traumatic brain injuries result in significant morbidity and mortality; in fact, falls are the leading cause of hospital admission and injury-related death in older adults. Reduction of fall risk is associated with improved physical and emotional well-being for aging adults, and risk minimization has the potential to enhance overall, long-term quality of life. Residents of long-term care facilities are at greater risk of falling than community-dwelling older adults, but both populations face significant fall risk. The specific fall prevention measures highlighted below are essential to reduce fall-related injury and mortality, as well as the high medical costs associated with falls in late life.
  • Overview: Risk of Falling and Older Adults
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2013-10)
    Falls are a major public health concern for older adults. Annually, 1 out of 3 Americans aged 65+ experiences a fall. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the leading cause of hospitalization for trauma and the leading cause of injury death for aging adults¹. Falls are also associated with numerous physical and psychological health conditions, decreased quality of life, and high health care costs.
  • Fall Prevention in Late Life
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2013-10)
    Falling is a major public health concern for older adults. One in 3 adults aged 65+ and 1 in 2 adults aged 80+ fall each year, often suffering major changes to health and quality of life. Unintentional falls and traumatic brain injuries result in significant morbidity and mortality; falls, in fact, are the leading cause of hospital admission and injury-related death in older adults. Reduction of fall risk is associated with improved physical and emotional well-being for aging adults, and risk minimization has the potential to enhance overall, long-term quality of life. Residents of long-term care facilities are at greater risk of falling than community-dwelling older adults, but both populations face significant fall risk. The specific fall prevention measures highlighted below are essential to reduce fall-related injury and mortality, as well as the high medical costs associated with falls in late life.
  • Fear of Falling and Older Adults: Finding Balance
    Center for Gerontology (Virginia Tech. Center for Gerontology, 2013-10)
    Falls are a major public health concern for older adults. Annually, 1 out of every 3 Americans aged 65+ experiences a fall. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the leading cause of hospitalization for trauma and the leading cause of injury death for aging adults. Falls are also associated with numerous physical and psychological health conditions, decreased quality of life, and high health care costs. Fear of Falling (FOF) is defined as an exaggerated concern about falling or the belief that one cannot prevent a fall. Intense anxiety about falling can be experienced by older adults who have fallen, as well as those who have not. Although studies have shown that women are at an elevated risk, fear of falling affects both men and women. Awareness of fall statistics may instill a fear in individuals, leading to behavior changes that limit functional abilities. As a result, individuals may experience social isolation and decreased emotional well-being. Excessive worry about falls is directly associated with a decrease in quality of life for older adults. It is therefore crucial that aging individuals try to strike a balance: staying actively engaged with their normal routines as much as possible while implementing reasonable, proactive safety measures to prevent falls.
  • Center for Gerontology Newsletter, Fall 2014/Winter 2015
    (Virginia Tech, 2015)
    The Center for Gerontology newsletter, published twice annually, provides faculty and project updates, along with recognitions received by faculty and students in the area of age-related research and activities.
  • Center for Gerontology Newsletter, Spring 2016
    (Virginia Tech, 2016)
    The Center for Gerontology newsletter, published twice annually, provides faculty and project updates, along with recognitions received by faculty and students in the area of age-related research and activities.
  • Center for Gerontology Newsletter, Spring 2009
    (Virginia Tech, 2009)
    The Center for Gerontology newsletter, published twice annually, provides faculty and project updates, along with recognitions received by faculty and students in the area of age-related research and activities.
  • Center for Gerontology Newsletter, Fall 2012
    (Virginia Tech, 2012)
    The Center for Gerontology newsletter, published twice annually, provides faculty and project updates, along with recognitions received by faculty and students in the area of age-related research and activities.
  • Center for Gerontology Newsletter, Fall 2010
    (Virginia Tech, 2010)
    The Center for Gerontology newsletter, published twice annually, provides faculty and project updates, along with recognitions received by faculty and students in the area of age-related research and activities.
  • Center for Gerontology Newsletter, Fall 2013
    (Virginia Tech, 2013)
    The Center for Gerontology newsletter, published twice annually, provides faculty and project updates, along with recognitions received by faculty and students in the area of age-related research and activities.
  • Center for Gerontology Newsletter, Spring 2011
    (Virginia Tech, 2011)
    The Center for Gerontology newsletter, published twice annually, provides faculty and project updates, along with recognitions received by faculty and students in the area of age-related research and activities.
  • Center for Gerontology Newsletter, Special Edition 2008
    (Virginia Tech, 2008)
    This special edition of the Center for Gerontology newsletter commemorates the center's 30th anniversary.