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  • Violence & Depression Among Virginia Middle School Students: Results From The Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    Suicide is the third leading cause of death for youth between the ages of 10 and 24. Complex peer, family, and romantic relationships, mental health concerns, and school stressors all impact suicide-related behaviors. Suicidal youth are often overwhelmed with feelings of helplessness and hopelessness, both of which can be brought on by bullying. Being bullied increases the chances youth will engage in suicide-related behaviors. Bullying can also result in physical injuries, social and emotional difficulties, and academic problems.
  • Substance Use Among Virginia Middle School Students: Results From The Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    Drug abuse most often begins in adolescence and young adulthood, when youth begin trying alcohol, tobacco, and illegal and prescription drugs. Adolescents most frequently abuse alcohol, followed by marijuana and tobacco. Repeated substance use can result in school failure, poor mental health, impaired memory, problems with family relationships and friendships, and increased overall risky behavior.
  • Violence & Depression Among Virginia High School Students: Results From The Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    Suicide is the third leading cause of death for youth between the ages of 10 and 24. Complex peer, family, and romantic relationships, mental health concerns, and school stressors all impact suicide-related behaviors. Suicidal youth are often overwhelmed with feelings of helplessness and hopelessness, both of which can be brought on by bullying. Being bullied increases the chances youth will engage in suicide-related behaviors. Bullying can also result in physical injuries, social and emotional difficulties, and academic problems.
  • Substance Use Among Virginia High School Students: Results From The Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    Drug abuse most often begins in adolescence and young adulthood, when youth begin trying alcohol, tobacco, and illegal and prescription drugs. Adolescents most frequently abuse alcohol, followed by marijuana and tobacco. Repeated substance use can result in school failure, poor mental health, impaired memory, problems with family relationships and friendships, and increased overall risky behavior.
  • Physical Activity Among Virginia High School Students: Results From The Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    Children and adolescents should participate in a daily minimum of 60 minutes of physical activity. Physical activity helps build and maintain healthy bones and muscles. It helps reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases, reduces feelings of depression and anxiety, and promotes psychological well being. The relationship between physical activity, health, and academic performance is well documented; physical activity can help students improve academic performance through factors such as increased concentration and attentiveness in the classroom. Excessive screen-time behaviors, such as using a computer and watching TV, for more than 2 hours daily have been linked to elevated blood pressure, elevated serum cholesterol, and being overweight or obese. Comprehensive school-based physical activity programs can help youth meet most of their physical activity needs. The CDC recommends schools provide daily physical education for students in kindergarten through grade 12, and at least 20 minutes of recess in addition to physical education.
  • Physical Activity Among Virginia Middle School Students: Results From The Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    Children and adolescents should participate in a daily minimum of 60 minutes of physical activity. Physical activity helps build and maintain healthy bones and muscles. It helps reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases, reduces feelings of depression and anxiety, and promotes psychological well being. The relationship between physical activity, health, and academic performance is well documented; physical activity can help students improve academic performance through factors such as increased concentration and attentiveness in the classroom. Excessive screen-time behaviors, such as using a computer and watching TV, for more than 2 hours daily have been linked to elevated blood pressure, elevated serum cholesterol, and being overweight or obese. Comprehensive school-based physical activity programs can help youth meet most of their physical activity needs. The CDC recommends schools provide daily physical education for students in kindergarten through grade 12, and at least 20 minutes of recess in addition to physical education.
  • Nutrition Among Virginia Middle School Students: Results From The Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    Healthy eating contributes to growth and development of children and adolescents. Choosing nutritious foods helps prevent high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and helps reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend healthy eating patterns, rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products. The guidelines recommend limiting added sugar, sodium, and saturated and trans fats. Poor eating patterns can affect health, cognitive development and school performance. Healthy students are better learners. Eating breakfast is associated with improved memory, reduced absenteeism, and improved mood. The CDC recommends that schools implement policies and programs that support healthy food environments, and provide students with learning opportunities that encourage healthy nutrition.
  • Nutrition Among Virginia High School Students: Results From The Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    Healthy eating contributes to growth and development of children and adolescents. Choosing nutritious foods helps prevent high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and helps reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend healthy eating patterns, rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products. The guidelines recommend limiting added sugar, sodium, and saturated and trans fats. Poor eating patterns can affect health, cognitive development and school performance. Healthy students are better learners. Eating breakfast is associated with improved memory, reduced absenteeism, and improved mood. The CDC recommends that schools implement policies and programs that support healthy food environments, and provide students with learning opportunities that encourage healthy nutrition.
  • Injury And Violence Among Virginia Middle School Students: Results From The Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    During adolescence, youth begin to spend more time without adult supervision, gain more independence, and are more likely to engage in risk-taking behaviors making them particularly vulnerable to injury and violence. Adolescents and young adults maintain the highest rates of fatal motor vehicle crash involvement. Youth violence is the third leading cause of death for people between the ages of 15 and 24. Adolescents can be victims, offenders, and/or witnesses to violence, which impacts their own physical, emotional, and mental health as well as that of their communities.
  • Injury And Violence Among Virginia High School Students: Results from the Virginia Youth Survey – 2015
    Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research (Virginia Tech Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2015)
    During adolescence, youth begin to spend more time without adult supervision, gain more independence, and are more likely to engage in risk-taking behaviors making them particularly vulnerable to injury and violence. Adolescents and young adults maintain the highest rates of fatal motor vehicle crash involvement. Youth violence is the third leading cause of death for people between the ages of 15 and 24. Adolescents can be victims, offenders, and/or witnesses to violence, which impacts their own physical, emotional, and mental health as well as that of their communities.
  • 2018-2022 Virginia Cancer Plan
    (Cancer Action Coalition of Virginia, 2018)
    In the Fall of 2017 and Spring of 2018, the Center facilitated the development of the Virginia 5 year cancer plan.
  • Proceedings from the Virginia Higher Education Conversation on Opioid Misuse and Addiction
    (Virginia Tech, 2018-05-01)
    On May 1, 2018, 71 higher education representatives from 23 colleges and universities from across Virginia, and community representatives from Health Departments, Community Services Boards, and law enforcement gathered for a day of conversations on how to jointly combat the opioid epidemic. An agenda for the event is included in Appendix A. A list of participants is included in Appendix B.
  • 2012 Public Health Forum Proceedings
    (Center for Public Health Practice and Research, 2012-05-14)
    Proceedings from the regional public health practice and research forum held at Virginia Tech in the Spring of 2012. Participants discussed public health needs in southwest Virginia and identified next steps and action items. A list of recommendations was also developed.