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dc.contributor.authorKing, Scott D.en
dc.contributor.authorAdam, Claudiaen
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-14T16:06:32Zen
dc.date.available2021-04-14T16:06:32Zen
dc.date.issued2014-10-01en
dc.identifier.issn0031-9201en
dc.identifier.otherAQ7ST (isidoc)en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/103026en
dc.description.abstractThe first attempts to quantify the width and height of hotspot swells were made more than 30. years ago. Since that time, topography, ocean-floor age, and sediment thickness datasets have improved considerably. Swell heights and widths have been used to estimate the heat flow from the core-mantle boundary, constrain numerical models of plumes, and as an indicator of the origin of hotspots. In this paper, we repeat the analysis of swell geometry and buoyancy flux for 54. hotspots, including the 37 considered by Sleep (1990) and the 49 considered by Courtillot et al. (2003), using the latest and most accurate data. We are able to calculate swell geometry for a number of hotspots that Sleep was only able to estimate by comparison with other swells. We find that in spite of the increased resolution in global bathymetry models there is significant uncertainty in our calculation of buoyancy fluxes due to differences in our measurement of the swells' width and height, the integration method (volume integration or cross-sectional area), and the variations of the plate velocities between HS2-Nuvel1a (Gripp and Gordon, 1990) and HS3-Nuvel1a (Gripp and Gordon, 2002). We also note that the buoyancy flux for Pacific hotspots is in general larger than for Eurasian, North American, African and Antarctic hotspots. Considering that buoyancy flux is linearly related to plate velocity, we speculate that either the calculation of buoyancy flux using plate velocity over-estimates the actual vertical flow of material from the deep mantle or that convection in the Pacific hemisphere is more vigorous than the Atlantic hemisphere. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.en
dc.format.extentPages 66-83en
dc.format.extent18 page(s)en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsIn Copyright (InC)en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectPhysical Sciencesen
dc.subjectGeochemistry & Geophysicsen
dc.subjectHotspot swellsen
dc.subjectDepth anomaliesen
dc.subjectBuoyancy fluxen
dc.subjectHeat flowen
dc.subjectSOUTH-PACIFIC SUPERSWELLen
dc.subjectMANTLE PLUMESen
dc.subjectTRANSITION ZONEen
dc.subjectHEAT-FLOWen
dc.subjectOCEANIC LITHOSPHEREen
dc.subjectSTRUCTURE BENEATHen
dc.subjectPLATE VELOCITIESen
dc.subjectORIGINen
dc.subjectMODELSen
dc.subjectSUBSIDENCEen
dc.subjectHotspot swellsen
dc.subjectDepth anomaliesen
dc.subjectBuoyancy fluxen
dc.subjectHeat flowen
dc.subject0201 Astronomical and Space Sciencesen
dc.subject0402 Geochemistryen
dc.subject0404 Geophysicsen
dc.subjectGeochemistry & Geophysicsen
dc.titleHotspot swells revisiteden
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.typeBook reviewen
dc.date.updated2021-04-14T16:06:26Zen
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en
dc.contributor.departmentGeosciencesen
dc.title.serialPhysics of the Earth and Plantary Interiorsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.pepi.2014.07.006en
dc.type.otherJournalen
dc.identifier.volume235en
dc.identifier.orcidKing, Scott [0000-0002-9564-5164 (orcid)]en
dc.identifier.eissn1872-7395en
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Scienceen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/Geosciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/COS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen


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