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dc.contributor.authorKavanaugh, Andrea L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFox, Edward A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSheetz, Steven D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Seungwonen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Lin Tzyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhalen, Travisen_US
dc.contributor.authorShoemaker, Donald J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNatsev, Apostolen_US
dc.contributor.authorXie, Lexingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-19T14:36:00Z
dc.date.available2013-06-19T14:36:00Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifierhttp://eprints.cs.vt.edu/archive/00001148/en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/19402
dc.descriptionSocial media (i.e., Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, YouTube) and other tools and services with user- generated content have made a staggering amount of information (and misinformation) available. Some government officials seek to leverage these resources to improve services and communication with citizens, especially during crises and emergencies. Yet, the sheer volume of social data streams generates substantial noise that must be filtered. Potential exists to rapidly identify issues of concern for emergency management by detecting meaningful patterns or trends in the stream of messages and information flow. Similarly, monitoring these patterns and themes over time could provide officials with insights into the perceptions and mood of the community that cannot be collected through traditional methods (e.g., phone or mail surveys) due to their substantive costs, especially in light of reduced and shrinking budgets of governments at all levels. We conducted a pilot study in 2010 with government officials in Arlington, Virginia (and to a lesser extent representatives of groups from Alexandria and Fairfax, Virginia) with a view to contributing to a general understanding of the use of social media by government officials as well as community organizations, businesses and the public. We were especially interested in gaining greater insight into social media use in crisis situations (whether severe or fairly routine crises, such as traffic or weather disruptions).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.publisherDepartment of Computer Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State Universityen_US
dc.subjectHuman-computer interactionen_US
dc.titleSocial Media for Cities, Counties and Communitiesen_US
dc.typeTechnical reporten_US
dc.identifier.trnumberTR-11-09en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://eprints.cs.vt.edu/archive/00001148/01/CCSR_White_Paper_Report_VT_IBM_Kavanaugh_Natsev.pdf


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