Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRagan, Eric Dennisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-12T08:01:05Z
dc.date.available2013-06-12T08:01:05Z
dc.date.issued2013-06-11en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:673en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/23207
dc.description.abstractThough many researchers have suggested that 3D virtual environments (VEs) could provide advantages for conceptual learning, few studies have attempted to evaluate the validity of this claim. While many educational VEs share the challenge of providing learners with information within 3D spaces, few researchers have investigated what approaches are used to help learn new information from 3D spatial representations. It is not understood how well learners can take advantage of 3D layouts to help understand information. Additionally, although complex arrangements of information within 3D space can potentially allow for large amounts of information to be presented within a VE, accessing this information can become more difficult due to the increased navigational challenges.
Complicating these issues are details regarding display types and interaction devices used for educational applications. Compared to desktop displays, more immersive VE systems often provide display features (e.g., stereoscopy, increased field of view) that support improved perception and understanding of spatial information. Additionally, immersive VE often allow more familiar, natural interaction methods (e.g., physical walking or rotation of the head and body) to control viewing within the virtual space. It is unknown how these features interact with the types of spatial information presentations to affect learning.
The research presented in this dissertation investigates these issues in order to further the knowledge of how to design VEs to support learning. The research includes six studies (five empirical experiments and one case study) designed to investigate how spatial information presentations affect learning effectiveness and learner strategies. This investigation includes consideration for the complexity of spatial information layouts, the features of display systems that could affect the effectiveness of spatial strategies, and the degree of navigational control for accessing information. Based on the results of these studies, we created a set of design guidelines for developing VEs for learning-related activities. By considering factors of virtual information presentation, as well as those based on the display-systems, our guidelines support design decisions for both the software and hardware required for creating effective educational VEs.
en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subject: virtual realityen_US
dc.subjectvisualizationen_US
dc.subjectlarge-display systemsen_US
dc.subjecteducational softwareen_US
dc.subjectspatial information presentationsen_US
dc.subjectlearningen_US
dc.subjectmemoen_US
dc.titleSupporting Learning through Spatial Information Presentations in Virtual Environmentsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Science and Applicationsen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBowman, Douglas Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberQuek, Francisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNorth, Christopher L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMayer, Richard Reinharten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith-Jackson, Tonya L.en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record