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dc.contributor.authorSinclair, Andrea L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:11:45Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:11:45Z
dc.date.issued2003-05-05en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05092003-090738en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/27610
dc.description.abstractRecent research on organizational justice suggests 3 elements of process-related justice: procedural, interpersonal, and informational justice. Early research on the fair process effect indicates that fair procedures in general can help to ameliorate the effects of negative outcomes. This study examined the relative importance of each specific process element in accounting for the fair process effect. In addition, this study examined whether there are substitutable effects among the process elements such that high fairness on one element substitutes for low fairness on another element. Administrative Assistants working at a university read 48 hypothetical profiles describing a supervisor's procedural,interpersonal and informational justice behaviors in handling a negative job-related outcome. Administrative Assistants provided overall judgments of the fairness of the situation. The policy capturing analysis indicated that the weights given to the fairness cues varied somewhat across individuals. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that participants' fairness policies could be grouped into 3 homogenous clusters: two "main effects clusters" and an "interaction cluster." The first main effects cluster equally weighted procedural, interpersonal and informational justice in their overall fairness evaluations. The second main effects cluster favored procedural justice over the other two forms of justice. Finally, participants in the interaction cluster utilized the three two-way interactions between the forms of justice. Between-subject analyses indicated that the available demographic and background variables were not related to the judges' policies. Research and practical implications are discussed.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartsinclair_dissertation.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectorganizational justiceen_US
dc.subjectfair process effecten_US
dc.titleDisentangling Contributions of Process Elements to the Fair Process Effect: A Policy-Capturing Approachen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHauenstein, Neil M. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDonovan, John J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFoti, Roseanne J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarlson, Kevin D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMuffo, John A.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05092003-090738/en_US
dc.date.sdate2003-05-09en_US
dc.date.rdate2003-05-19
dc.date.adate2003-05-19en_US


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