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dc.contributor.authorFarinholt, Kevin M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:18:59Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:18:59Z
dc.date.issued2005-11-22en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-11232005-123339en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/29722
dc.description.abstractIonic polymer transducers comprise a class of active material that exhibit interesting chemoelectromechanical coupling capabilities. With the ability to convert energy between chemical, electrical and mechanical domains, these materials offer potential for use in numerous engineering applications. The research presented in this dissertation focuses primarily on the electromechanical coupling that exists within these ionic polymer materials. When plated with a conductive surface electrode, these ionomeric membranes function effectively as either sensors or actuators. Mechanically compliant, these transducers demonstrate large strain, but limited force, capabilites while operating at low excitation voltages. The objective of this research is to improve understanding of the transduction properties inherent in the ionic polymer. Most of the existing work in this area has focused on the actuation response, therefore the focus of this research is on providing a better understanding of the sensing and impedance responses of the ionic polymer transducer. Using transport theory as the basis, a set of analytical models are developed to characterize the charge motion that develops within an ionomer when subject to either mechanical or electrical loading. These models characterize the internal potential and charge density responses of the membrane, as well as the expected surface current that would be measured as the result of external loading. In addition to the analytical work, numerous experimental characterizations of the membrane are also presented. The ionic polymer's actuation, sensing and impedance responses are each considered as a function of the counterion and solvent type present within the ionic polymer. These studies demonstrate the importance of the ionomer's impedance response in understanding the electromechanical capabilites of an ionic polymer transducer. Most sample-to-sample variation can be attributed to the voltage to current conversion that occurs within the ionic polymer. By relating these experimental results to the analytical models, it is possible to characterize these changes in performance in terms of the effective diffusion and permittivity parameters of the transducer. A final series of experiments are also considered to determine the effectiveness of the model in predicting the impedance response as a function of temperature, solvent viscosity and preloading of the membrane.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartFarinholt_ETD.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectsensoren_US
dc.subjectactuatoren_US
dc.subjectsensing responseen_US
dc.subjectimpedance responseen_US
dc.subjectionic polymer transducersen_US
dc.titleModeling and characterization of ionic polymer transducers for sensing and actuationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairLeo, Donald J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInman, Daniel J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHendricks, Scott L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWoolsey, Craig A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLong, Timothy E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKoh, Kwang Jinen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-11232005-123339/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-11-23en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-12-04
dc.date.adate2005-12-04en_US


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