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dc.contributor.authorVeak, Tyler J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:20:47Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:20:47Z
dc.date.issued2003-08-20en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-12172003-144054en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/30125
dc.description.abstractAndrew Feenberg, a philosopher of technology, argues for a democratic rationalization of technology, whereby subjugated actors intervene in the design process to achieve their interests. He claims that environmentalism represents one of the greatest opportunities for this kind of intervention. His suggestion seems viable; most if not all of the current environmental problems stem from maladaptive technologies. Transforming these technologies is therefore imperative if we are to move toward more sustainable societies. Feenberg, however, does not address the details of his proposal or offer more than a few brief examples of what he is advocating. I use Feenberg's Critical Theory of technology to analyze and assess various environmentalisms. Along the way I expose the deficiencies of his theory and attempt build on his work. One problem, however, is that environmentalism is by no means a homogonous entity; rather, it is composed of numerous strands with their own unique histories, aims, and strategies. I argue that of the various environmentalisms grassroots environmental justice resonates most with Feenberg's theory. To illustrate, I present a case study of the toxics movement that emerged out of the Love Canal incident. I conclude by showing how grassroots environmental justice could enhance their effectiveness by employing the suggested Critical Theory of technology.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartAppendix.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartBody.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartBibliography.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartFront.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartCV_std.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmentalismen_US
dc.subjectAndrew Feenbergen_US
dc.subjectPhilosophy of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectCritical Theoryen_US
dc.subjectMarxismen_US
dc.titleConcretizing Sustainable Worlds: Environmentalism as a Politics of Technological Transformationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentScience and Technology Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineScience and Technology Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairLuke, Timothy W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPitt, Joseph C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarrow, Mark V. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirsh, Richard F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuhrman, Ellsworth R.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-12172003-144054/en_US
dc.date.sdate2003-12-17en_US
dc.date.rdate2008-10-12
dc.date.adate2003-12-23en_US


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