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dc.contributor.authorLeist, Marilyn Thomasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:21:36Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:21:36Z
dc.date.issued1998-03-31en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-31398-153455en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/30395
dc.description.abstractThe problem investigated in this study was how individuals participate in the local units of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) and particularly how their participation relates to the program and policy initiatives of the national association. The purpose was to understand and describe how individuals experience branch membership, how they respond to the current program and policy initiatives of the association, and to examine some of the differences between members with regard to the salience of the initiatives. The research issues concerned why women join and retain their membership in local units, how they participate, and how they promote the program and policies of the national association. The grounded theory method was used to perform this qualitative study. Ten participants, in two branches, were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed, using The Ethnograph tool, and then open, axial, and selective coding was carried out to discern patterns and themes from the data. The findings, which emerged from the data, resulted in a model of four stages of increasing social activism and responsiveness to the national agenda. Attending to the mission of the association--to promote equity, lifelong education, and positive societal change--became increasingly important to some members as they moved through the stages. During the first stage, Participates, members simply attended meetings, took part in activities and fund-raisers, and some performed a branch role. During the second stage, Supports, they promoted education opportunities for specific women and girls, by setting up study groups, providing for local scholarships, or other educational activities. During the third stage, Facilitates, members actually promoted equity by disseminating information in the community concerning the association's issues. During the fourth stage, Advocates, members worked in the community to make changes based on issues from the national agenda. The conclusions addressed member motivation, the importance of the social capital built through participation, and the internal consequences of membership. While most women joined and retained their membership in the local units for social contact, some joined because of the organization's mission. Their motivation to join and retain their membership made a difference in their level and kind of branch involvement. The importance of the social capital built during participation in branch activities, often diminished, is of utmost importance to the usually, conservative members as some of them became more engaged in the activist, national agenda. The internal consequences of membership in the local units of the voluntary association were more important to members than the external consequences, which led to incongruence between the national office and the branches. This study adds to the body of knowledge regarding voluntary associations, particularly with respect to understanding how individuals experience membership at the local level, their goal orientation, and their motivation to participate over time.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartetd.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectgrass-roots organizationsen_US
dc.subjectamerican association of university womenen_US
dc.subjectwomens voluntary associationsen_US
dc.subjectwomens developmenten_US
dc.titleIncreasing Stages of Social Activism and Responsiveness to the National Agenda: How Women Experience Membership in the American Association of University Womenen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAdult Educationen_US
dc.description.degreeEd. D.en_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAdult Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairStubblefield, Harold W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCline, Marvin Geralden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStith, Sandra M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWiswell, Albert K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoucouvalas, Marcieen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-31398-153455/en_US
dc.date.sdate1998-03-31en_US
dc.date.rdate1999-04-14
dc.date.adate1998-04-14en_US


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