Differences in Sleep Quality and Sleepiness among Veterinary Medical Students at Multiple Institutions before and after the Pandemic Induced Transition to Online Learning

dc.contributor.authorNappier, Michael T.en
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez, Elizabeth E.en
dc.contributor.authorBartl-Wilson, Laraen
dc.contributor.authorBoynton, Elizabeth P.en
dc.contributor.authorHanlon, Alexandra L.en
dc.contributor.authorLozano, Alicia J.en
dc.contributor.authorNg, Zenithsonen
dc.contributor.authorOgunmayowa, Oluwatosinen
dc.contributor.authorShoop, Tiffanyen
dc.contributor.authorWelborn, Nancy D.en
dc.contributor.authorWuerz, Juliaen
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-27T12:54:50Zen
dc.date.available2023-09-27T12:54:50Zen
dc.date.updated2023-09-26T15:43:59Zen
dc.description.abstractPoor sleep health has been previously documented in veterinary medical students. However, it is not known how universal or widespread this problem is. This study evaluated Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores to measure sleep health among students at seven colleges of veterinary medicine in the United States (US). Inadvertently, the transition to online only learning due to the global COVID-19 pandemic was also captured. Veterinary students were found to have universally poor sleep quality and high daytime sleepiness. The transition to online only learning appeared to have little impact on sleep quality, but improved daytime sleepiness scores were observed. The findings suggest poor sleep health is common among veterinary medical students at multiple institutions in the US and that further investigation is necessary.en
dc.description.versionAccepted versionen
dc.format.extent11 page(s)en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3138/jvme-2023-0054en
dc.identifier.eissn1943-7218en
dc.identifier.issn0748-321Xen
dc.identifier.orcidHanlon, Alexandra [0000-0002-9612-2197]en
dc.identifier.orcidNappier, Michael [0000-0003-0373-3309]en
dc.identifier.orcidBezar, Emily [0000-0002-9612-2197]en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/116340en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Toronto Pressen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectVeterinary Sciencesen
dc.subjectEducation & Educational Researchen
dc.subjectsleep qualityen
dc.subjectsleepinessen
dc.subjectveterinary medical studentsen
dc.subjectPittsburgh sleep quality indexen
dc.subjectEpworth sleepiness scaleen
dc.subjectCURRICULUMen
dc.subject3009 Veterinary Sciencesen
dc.subject30 Agricultural, Veterinary and Food Sciencesen
dc.subject3903 Education Systemsen
dc.subject39 Educationen
dc.subjectBasic Behavioral and Social Scienceen
dc.subjectSleep Researchen
dc.subjectBehavioral and Social Scienceen
dc.subject3 Good Health and Well Beingen
dc.titleDifferences in Sleep Quality and Sleepiness among Veterinary Medical Students at Multiple Institutions before and after the Pandemic Induced Transition to Online Learningen
dc.title.serialJournal of Veterinary Medical Educationen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.otherArticleen
dc.type.otherEarly Accessen
dc.type.otherJournalen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Scienceen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/Statisticsen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicineen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/Small Animal Clinical Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Graduate studentsen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Graduate students/Masters studentsen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/Statistics/Center for Biostatistics & Health Data Science (CBHDS)en
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