The Effects of Age and Sex on Mental Rotation Performance, Verbal Performance, and Brain Electrical Activity

dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Jonathan E.en
dc.contributor.committeechairBell, Martha Annen
dc.contributor.committeememberHauenstein, Neil M. A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCooper, Robin K. Pannetonen
dc.contributor.committeememberFranchina, Joseph J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberFriedman, Bruce H.en
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:08:32Zen
dc.date.adate2001-03-29en
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:08:32Zen
dc.date.issued2001-02-09en
dc.date.rdate2002-03-29en
dc.date.sdate2001-03-27en
dc.description.abstractIn adult populations, it is generally accepted there is an overall male advantage on spatial tasks and an overall female advantage on verbal tasks. These differences are inconsistent in children. The present study examined relations among age, sex, EEG hemispheric activation, and performance on spatial and verbal tasks. Thirty-two eight-year-olds (16 boys) and 32 college students (16 men) had EEG recorded at baseline and while performing a computerized 2-dimensional Gingerbread Man mental rotation task, a computerized 2-dimensional Alphanumeric mental rotation task, a computerized 3-dimensional Basketball Player mental rotation task, and a computerized Lexical Decision-Making task. Additionally, participants completed a paper-and-pencil Water Level task and an oral Verbal Fluency task. On the 2-dimensional Alphanumeric and 3-dimensional Basketball Player mental rotation tasks men performed better than boys, but the performance of women and girls did not differ. On the Lexical Decision-Making and Water level tasks, men performed better than women, while there was no difference between boys and girls. No sex differences were found on the 2-dimensional Gingerbread Man mental rotation task or Verbal Fluency task. Analyses of task-related data also indicate that computer familiarization or computer related task demands might contribute to sex differences on computerized tasks. EEG analyses indicated that, on the 2-dimensional Alphanumeric mental rotation task, men exhibited more left posterior temporal activation than women, while there were no differences between boys and girls. Additionally, there was evidence that simple, or 2-dimensional, mental rotation tasks are associated with left posterior brain activation, while 3-dimensional mental rotation tasks are associated with right posterior brain activation. On the 2-dimensional Gingerbread Man mental rotation task, males exhibited more activation of the left parietal area than females, while on the 2-dimensional Alphanumeric mental rotation task, men exhibited more activation of the left posterior temporal area than women. On the 3-dimensional Basketball player mental rotation task, all participants exhibited greater activation of the right parietal area than the left parietal area.en
dc.description.degreePh. D.en
dc.identifier.otheretd-03272001-114239en
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-03272001-114239/en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/26514en
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.relation.haspartETD-JR.pdfen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectMental Rotationen
dc.subjectSex Differencesen
dc.subjectVerbal Fluencyen
dc.subjectEEGen
dc.titleThe Effects of Age and Sex on Mental Rotation Performance, Verbal Performance, and Brain Electrical Activityen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en
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