Effects of Bit Chewing on Gastric Emptying, Small Intestinal Transit, and Orocecal Transit Times in Clinically Normal Horses

dc.contributor.authorPatton, Molly E.en
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Frank M.en
dc.contributor.authorBogers, Sophie H.en
dc.contributor.authorWong, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Harold C.en
dc.contributor.authorWerre, Stephen R.en
dc.contributor.authorByron, Christopher R.en
dc.date.accessioned2023-08-11T17:30:02Zen
dc.date.available2023-08-11T17:30:02Zen
dc.date.issued2023-08-04en
dc.date.updated2023-08-11T14:33:34Zen
dc.description.abstractIleus is a common life-threatening problem in horses, and currently available treatments may be ineffective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether bit chewing, a form of sham feeding, decreases the gastric emptying time (GET), small intestinal transit time (SITT), and total orocecal transit time (OCTT) in clinically normal horses in a prospective crossover study. Nine healthy horses were acclimated and fed a standardized diet. Following 24 h of fasting, self-contained video endoscopy capsules and acetaminophen were administered into the stomach via a nasogastric tube. Each horse underwent experimental (bit chewing for 20 min every 6 h) or control (no bit chewing) conditions, with a 3-week minimum washout period between conditions. The horses were enrolled in either part of the study until all video capsules were retrieved and/or 30 days lapsed. The video capsules were recovered from manure, and GET, SITT, and OCTT were determined from a video analysis. Bit chewing significantly decreased OCTT (<i>p</i> = 0.015) compared to the control conditions. Bit chewing decreased GET and SITT, but the differences were not significant. The mean (median) times determined via the video capsule analysis for the bit-chewing conditions were as follows: GET, 2.34 h (2.86 h); SITT, 3.22 h (3.65 h); and OCTT, 5.13 h (6.15 h), and for the control conditions, they were as follows: GET, 3.93 h (5 h); SITT, 3.79 h (4.4 h); and OCTT, 8.02 h (9.92 h). Bit chewing decreased OCTT in healthy horses. Because this segment of the gastrointestinal tract is frequently affected by ileus, bit chewing may be a safe and inexpensive intervention for that condition in horses. Further investigation in clinical patients with ileus is warranted.en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.citationPatton, M.E.; Andrews, F.M.; Bogers, S.H.; Wong, D.; McKenzie, H.C., III; Werre, S.R.; Byron, C.R. Effects of Bit Chewing on Gastric Emptying, Small Intestinal Transit, and Orocecal Transit Times in Clinically Normal Horses. Animals 2023, 13, 2518.en
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/ani13152518en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/116029en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleEffects of Bit Chewing on Gastric Emptying, Small Intestinal Transit, and Orocecal Transit Times in Clinically Normal Horsesen
dc.title.serialAnimalsen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten

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