Early Skeletal Muscle Adaptations to Short-Term High-Fat Diet in Humans Before Changes in Insulin Sensitivity

dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Angela S.en
dc.contributor.authorHaynie, Kimberly R.en
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, Ryan P.en
dc.contributor.authorOsterberg, Kristin L.en
dc.contributor.authorBoutagy, Nabil E.en
dc.contributor.authorFrisard, Madlyn I.en
dc.contributor.authorDavy, Brenda M.en
dc.contributor.authorDavy, Kevin P.en
dc.contributor.authorHulver, Matthew W.en
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Nutrition, Foods, and Exerciseen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-17T20:27:01Zen
dc.date.available2016-11-17T20:27:01Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-01en
dc.description.abstractObjective—The purpose of this investigation was to understand the metabolic adaptations to a short-term (5 days), isocaloric, high fat diet (HFD) in healthy, young males. Methods—Two studies were undertaken with 12 subjects. Study 1 investigated the effect of the HFD on skeletal muscle substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Study 2 assessed the metabolic and transcriptional response in skeletal muscle to the transition from a fasted-to-fed state using a high fat meal challenge prior to and following 5 days of HFD. Results—Study 1 showed no effect of a HFD on skeletal muscle metabolism or insulin sensitivity in fasting samples. Study 2 showed that a HFD elicits significant increases in fasting serum endotoxin, and disrupts the normal postprandial excursions of serum endotoxin, and metabolic and transcriptional responses in skeletal muscle. These effects following 5 days of HFD were accompanied by an altered fasting and postprandial response in the ratio of phosphorylated to total p38 protein. These changes all occurred in the absence of alterations in insulin sensitivity. Conclusions—Our findings provide evidence for early biological adaptations to high fat feeding that proceed and possibly lead to insulin resistance.en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
dc.format.extent720 - 724 (5) page(s)en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/oby.21031en
dc.identifier.issn1930-7381en
dc.identifier.issue4en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73470en
dc.identifier.volume23en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000351832400002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectEndocrinology & Metabolismen
dc.subjectNutrition & Dieteticsen
dc.subjectMETABOLIC ENDOTOXEMIAen
dc.subjectRESISTANCEen
dc.subjectOBESITYen
dc.subjectINFLAMMATIONen
dc.subjectCHOLESTEROLen
dc.subjectGLUCOSEen
dc.subjectPROTEINen
dc.subjectFIBERen
dc.subjectMENen
dc.titleEarly Skeletal Muscle Adaptations to Short-Term High-Fat Diet in Humans Before Changes in Insulin Sensitivityen
dc.title.serialObesityen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/CALS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Human Nutrition, Foods, & Exerciseen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciencesen
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