Fat and Carbohydrate Interact to Potentiate Food Reward in Healthy Weight but Not in Overweight or Obesity

dc.contributor.authorPerszyk, Emily E.en
dc.contributor.authorHutelin, Zachen
dc.contributor.authorTrinh, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorKanyamibwa, Arseneen
dc.contributor.authorFromm, Sophieen
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Xue S.en
dc.contributor.authorWall, Kathryn M.en
dc.contributor.authorFlack, Kyle D.en
dc.contributor.authorDiFeliceantonio, Alexandra G.en
dc.contributor.authorSmall, Dana M.en
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Nutrition, Foods, and Exerciseen
dc.contributor.departmentFralin Biomedical Research Instituteen
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-09T19:44:20Zen
dc.date.available2021-04-09T19:44:20Zen
dc.date.issued2021-04-06en
dc.date.updated2021-04-09T13:48:41Zen
dc.description.abstractPrior work suggests that actual, but not estimated, energy density drives the reinforcing value of food and that energy from fat and carbohydrate can interact to potentiate reward. Here we sought to replicate these findings in an American sample and to determine if the effects are influenced by body mass index (BMI). Thirty participants with healthy weight (HW; BMI 21.92 ± 1.77; <i>M ± SD</i>) and 30 participants with overweight/obesity (OW/OB; BMI 29.42 ± 4.44) rated pictures of common American snacks in 120-kcal portions for liking, familiarity, frequency of consumption, expected satiety, healthiness, energy content, energy density, and price. Participants then completed an auction task where they bid for the opportunity to consume each food. Snacks contained either primarily carbohydrate, primarily fat, or roughly equal portions of fat and carbohydrate (combo). Replicating prior work, we found that participants with HW bid the most for combo foods in linear mixed model analyses. This effect was not observed among individuals with OW/OB. Additionally, in contrast with previous reports, our linear regression analyses revealed a negative relationship between the actual energy density of the snacks and bid amount that was mediated by food price. Our findings support altered macronutrient reinforcement in obesity and highlight potential influences of the food environment on the regulation of food reward.en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.citationPerszyk, E.E.; Hutelin, Z.; Trinh, J.; Kanyamibwa, A.; Fromm, S.; Davis, X.S.; Wall, K.M.; Flack, K.D.; DiFeliceantonio, A.G.; Small, D.M. Fat and Carbohydrate Interact to Potentiate Food Reward in Healthy Weight but Not in Overweight or Obesity. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1203.en
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/103001en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectfood reward/reinforcementen
dc.subjectwillingness to payen
dc.subjectmacronutrienten
dc.subjectcarbohydrateen
dc.subjectfaten
dc.subjectBMIen
dc.titleFat and Carbohydrate Interact to Potentiate Food Reward in Healthy Weight but Not in Overweight or Obesityen
dc.title.serialNutrientsen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.dcmitypeStillImageen
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