Relationship Between Teacher Self Efficacy and Teacher Behaviors and Student Achievement

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Date
2023-09-11
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Publisher
Virginia Tech
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between teacher self-efficacy (TSES) score and observable teacher instructional behaviors (CSAS) score and student academic achievement (SOL) score. This study addressed the following question: What is the relationship between teacher self-efficacy and teacher behavior and student academic achievement? More specifically, the researcher studied the relationship between teacher self-efficacy score and observable teacher instructional behaviors score, teacher self-efficacy scores and student academic performance score, and observable teacher instructional behaviors score and student academic performance score. Research on implications that TSE has on teacher behaviors adds to a relatively limited literature base that holds possibilities for leaders to elicit positive school change through improved instructional practices and higher student achievement.

To establish whether there was a relationship between TSE and observable teacher instructional behaviors, TSE and student academic achievement and observable teacher instructional behaviors and student academic achievement, this study used a quantitative analysis method that utilizes a simple linear regression model. The simple linear regression model isolated observable teacher behavior in model 1 and student academic achievement in model 2 and model 3 as the dependent variable. Control variables included limiting the study to 20 teachers who teach core curriculum subjects in grades 6-12 that also have an end of course Virginia Standards of Learning assessment (SOL).

The researcher identified regression relationships and their statistical significance and interpreted results to reach a conclusion that addressed each research question. The researcher highlighted potential relationships between teacher self-efficacy and student achievement, teacher self-efficacy and observable teacher instructional behaviors and observable teacher instructional behaviors and student achievement. This included a finding that the relationship between teacher self-efficacy and student achievement for the participants in this study was significant and positively correlated. The model indicated that TSE explained 42.1% of variations in student SOL scores. The regression relationship between TSE and student SOL scores revealed a positive correlation since the standardized coefficient was 0.463 > 0. That is as the teacher's self-efficacy score increased then the student SOL scores improved.

Implications for practitioners included principals considering professional development opportunities that support increased teacher self-efficacy and promote stronger student engagement in the learning process and identifying non-instructional behaviors that teachers engage in that might negatively impact student achievement. Recommendations for future investigation were also suggested by the researcher and included expanding the study to increase the number of participants. Increasing the number of participants would allow for an increase in the total number of TSES scores, CSAS scores, and student achievement scores.

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Keywords
Collective Teacher Efficacy, Professional Learning Community, Socioeconomic Status Teacher Self-Efficacy, Teacher-Student Relationship
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