User information satisfaction (UIS) and user productivity: an empirical examination

dc.contributor.authorGatian, Amy Elizabeth Williamsen
dc.contributor.committeechairHicks Jr., James O.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBonham, Thirwall W.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Robert M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMaher, John J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Eric P.en
dc.contributor.departmentAccountingen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-09T20:43:51Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-09T20:43:51Zen
dc.date.issued1989en
dc.description.abstractIn this research the relationships between user information satisfaction (UIS) and user productivity were examined. Two users groups were used to test the following hypotheses: H₁<sub>A</sub>: There is no relationship between UIS and perceptions of decision-making quality for academic department heads. H₁<sub>B</sub>: There is no relationship between UIS and perceptions of decision-making quality for managers within the controller’s office. H₂: There is no relationship between UIS and objectively measured productivity for managers within the controller’s office. H₃: There is no relationship between UIS and a user’s length of experience with a system. H₄<sub>A</sub>: There is no relationship between UIS and a user’s age. H₄<sub>B</sub>: There is no relationship between UIS and a user’s sex. H₄<sub>C</sub>: There is no relationship between UIS and a user’s level of education. Data utilized in testing the hypotheses were collected with a packet of six questionnaires mailed to the controllers of 100 universities. Usable responses were obtained from 107 of 300 controller’s office managers and 77 of 300 academic users. H₁<sub>A</sub>, H₁<sub>B</sub> and H₂ were tested with canonical correlation analysis. H₃, H₄<sub>A</sub>, H₄<sub>B</sub> and H₄<sub>C</sub> were tested with multiple regression. The findings can be summarized as follows: 1. Satisfaction with computer processing was correlated with making better operating budget decisions for both groups and helping academic users track activities in research, grant and designated gift accounts. 2. Satisfaction with system related problem finding was correlated with elimination of steps and making jobs easier for managers, and with helping academic users track activity in research accounts, and to feel they have benefited overall from FRS. 3. Satisfaction with the linear combination of inputs and problem finding was correlated with financial transactions per full time employee equivalents (FTE), late internal reports per total internal reports and number of ledger accounts per FTE. 4. More frequent users of FRS were more satisfied. Additionally, UIS and mandatory system usage were positively correlated. 5. UIS and sex were moderately correlated. Specifically, males within the academic group were less satisfied with FRS than the females surveyed.en
dc.description.degreePh. D.en
dc.format.extentxiii, 239 leavesen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/54361en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
dc.relation.isformatofOCLC# 21997334en
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subject.lccLD5655.V856 1989.G385en
dc.subject.lcshFRS (Information retrieval system)en
dc.subject.lcshManagement information systems -- Use studiesen
dc.subject.lcshInformation storage and retrieval systems -- Accounting -- Use studiesen
dc.subject.lcshAccounting -- Data processing -- Use studiesen
dc.titleUser information satisfaction (UIS) and user productivity: an empirical examinationen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
thesis.degree.disciplineAccountingen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
LD5655.V856_1989.G385.pdf
Size:
7.5 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format