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dc.contributor.authorKo, Hayoungen
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-07T19:56:38Zen
dc.date.available2021-10-07T19:56:38Zen
dc.date.issued2021-09-08en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/105201en
dc.description.abstractThe Brief Adjustment Scale-6 (BASE-6) was recently developed and initially examined as a brief, reliable, no-cost survey for measuring general psychological functioning within Measurement-Based Care (MBC). This study aims to further evaluate the psychometric properties of the BASE-6 in both clinical and nonclinical populations. More specifically, psychometric properties including reliability and validity, generalizability for different race/ethnic samples, and clinical utility within the context of MBC were examined. Three adult samples participated in this study: online community participants (Sample 1: n = 394), college students (Sample 2: n = 249), and individuals receiving outpatient clinical services (Sample 3: n = 80). Participants within the clinical sample regularly completed the BASE-6 while receiving evidence-based treatment in a community based psychological training clinic, where the practice of MBC is standard. Results showed that the BASE-6 had a high level of internal consistency and good test-retest reliability. It showed high convergent validity through a significant positive correlation with total and subscale scores of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21). Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) results supported a unidimensional model that strongly fit the data. All results were uniform across samples. When comparing the clinical and nonclinical samples, participants from the clinical sample demonstrated higher scores in total and most of the single items of the BASE-6. Finally, within the clinical sample, the BASE-6 was sensitive enough to capture change over time by demonstrating a large effect size of pre-post treatment changes and significant linear change in multilevel growth modeling. These results support the BASE-6 as a reliable and valid measure that has a one-factor structure, regardless of race/ethnicity and participants’ clinical status. Additionally, it can sensitively detect clinical change in individuals over the course of the treatment. Thus, the BASE-6 appears to accurately monitor overall psychological adjustment.  en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.subjectMeasurement Based Careen
dc.subjectClinical Utilityen
dc.subjectValidationen
dc.subjectPsychological Adjustmenten
dc.subjectOutcome Monitoringen
dc.titleBrief Adjustment Scale - 6 for Measurement-Based Care: Further Evaluation of Psychometric Properties, Ethnic Samples, and Clinical Utilityen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.description.degreeM.S.en
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineClinical Scienceen
dc.contributor.committeechairCooper, Lee D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberStanton, Kaseyen
dc.contributor.committeememberMcDonnell, Christinaen
dc.description.abstractgeneralThe Brief Adjustment Scale-6 (BASE-6) is a short, no-cost survey that assesses general psychological adjustment. It can be used in a psychotherapy setting to evaluate overall functioning of individuals on a regular basis. This study aims to further investigate the BASE-6 in both clinical and nonclinical populations, more specifically, whether the BASE-6 questionnaire is reliable, consistent, and valid with various race/ethnic populations. Additionally, it was examined if the BASE-6 can sensitively capture the change in psychological adjustment over the course of treatment. Three adult groups participated in this study: online community participants (Sample 1: n = 394), college students (Sample 2: n = 249), and individuals receiving outpatient clinical services (Sample 3: n = 80). Participants within the clinical sample regularly completed the BASE-6 while receiving psychotherapy in a community based psychological training clinic. Results showed that the BASE-6 was a reliable, consistent measure and the items all measured the same construct – general psychological adjustment. The BASE-6 was also highly correlated with depression, anxiety, and stress. Results did not differ across samples or race/ethnicity. When comparing the clinical and nonclinical samples, participants from the clinical sample showed higher scores of the BASE-6. Finally, within the clinical sample, the BASE-6 was sensitive enough to capture change over time by demonstrating large treatment changes from the beginning until the end of the treatment. These results support the BASE-6 as a reliable and valid measure regardless of race/ethnicity and participants’ clinical status. Additionally, it can sensitively detect clinical changes in clients over the course of the treatment. Thus, the BASE-6 appears to accurately monitor overall psychological adjustment.en


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