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dc.contributor.authorVillalongo Andino, Mara D.en
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-22T15:27:46Zen
dc.date.available2022-06-22T15:27:46Zen
dc.date.issued2022-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/110862en
dc.description.abstractIndividuals with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) are typically perceived by others as shy, submissive, or risk-averse. However, recent work has identified an understudied subtype within SAD characterized by high levels of anger and high-risk or novelty-seeking impulsive behaviors. Interestingly, this subtype bears conceptual similarities with prior accounts of vulnerable narcissism. For example, both are associated with concerns regarding self-presentation and how they are perceived by others. The angry-impulsive subtype and vulnerable narcissism may further share similar etiologic origins and similar associations with self-reported anger, impulsivity, and anxiety-related characteristics. However, despite these key similarities no prior work has systematically evaluated the common and potentially distinguishing factors within and between these conceptually similar but diagnostically distinct groups. For example, cognitive features such as fear of negative evaluation and interpersonal rivalry could be distinguishing features of SAD and vulnerable narcissism, although the utility of these distinguishing features to clarify the differential diagnosis remains unknown. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to utilize a person-centered analytic approach (latent profile analysis; LPA) to empirically establish whether vulnerable narcissistic traits exist within high anger, risk-prone individuals who are also socially anxious, or alternatively whether specific features of each disorder can be used to disambiguate them empirically. Results of this work supported the existence of the angry impulsive socially anxious subtype and supported a relationship between that group and vulnerable narcissistic traits. These findings have implications for treatment selection among affected individuals and may further clarify why prior work evaluating interventions for adults with SAD and angry impulsive features has been met with only limited success.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.subjectSocial anxiety disorderen
dc.subjectVulnerable narcissismen
dc.subjectLatent profile analysisen
dc.titleIdentifying the Relationship Between the Angry Impulsive Social Anxiety Subtype and Vulnerable Narcissism Utilizing Latent Profile Analysisen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.description.degreeM.S.en
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineClinical Scienceen
dc.contributor.committeechairRichey, John A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberHauenstein, Neilen
dc.contributor.committeememberStanton, Kaseyen
dc.description.abstractgeneralIndividuals with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) are typically perceived by others as shy, submissive, or risk-averse. However, recent work has identified an understudied subtype within SAD characterized by high levels of anger and high-risk or novelty-seeking impulsive behaviors. Interestingly, this subtype has conceptual similarities with descriptions of vulnerable narcissism. For example, both are associated with concerns regarding self-presentation and how they are perceived by others. The angry-impulsive subtype and vulnerable narcissism may further share similar origins and similar associations with self-reported anger, impulsivity, and anxiety-related characteristics. However, despite these key similarities no prior work has evaluated the common and potentially distinctive factors within and between these distinct groups. For example, features such as fear of negative evaluation and interpersonal rivalry could be distinguishing features of SAD and vulnerable narcissism, although the utility of these differentiating features to clarify the differential diagnosis is unknown. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to utilize a person-centered analytic approach (latent profile analysis; LPA) to establish whether vulnerable narcissistic traits exist within high anger, risk-prone individuals who are also socially anxious, or whether specific features of each disorder can be used to differentiate them. Results of this work supported the existence of the angry impulsive socially anxious subtype and supported a relationship between that group and vulnerable narcissistic traits. These findings have implications for treatment selection among affected individuals and may further clarify why prior work evaluating interventions for adults with SAD and angry impulsive features has been met with only limited success.en


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